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Article: Epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in a boarding school: Serological analysis of 1570 cases

TitleEpidemiological investigation of an outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in a boarding school: Serological analysis of 1570 cases
Authors
Keywords2009 pandemic H1N1
Influenza
Outbreak
Serological analysis
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcv
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Virology, 2011, v. 50 n. 3, p. 235-239 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: A large number of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infections were localized in school populations. Objectives: To describe the epidemiology, clinical features and risk factors associated with an outbreak that occurred at a vocational boarding school in Guangzhou, P.R. China. Study design: Data were collected prospectively and retrospectively through the use of on-site doctors and a post-outbreak survey and blood collection. The survey was used to confirm symptoms, and to investigate a series of flu-related factors such as dormitory conditions, health habits, vaccine history and population contact history. Blood samples were taken for serological analysis. Pandemic H1N1 infection was initially confirmed by a real-time RT-PCR assay. Following the identification of the outbreak by the Guangzhou CDC on September 4, cases were diagnosed symptomatically and retrospectively by serological analysis using the hemagglutination inhibition assay and a neutralization assay. Results: The infection rate was 32% (505/1570) and the attack rate was 22.2% (349/1570). The asymptomatic infection rate was 9.9% (156/1570). Sharing a classroom (OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.62-2.91) and dormitory space (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.84-2.93) was associated with higher rates of infection. Opening windows for ventilation was the only control measure that significantly protected against infection. Conclusion: Social isolation and quarantine should be used to prevent the spread of infection. Ventilation and a control of air flow between classrooms and dorms should be implemented as possible. School closures may be effective if implemented early. © 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135282
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.016
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.812
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China2009ZX10004-306
2009ZX10004-213
Funding Information:

Work supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (grants # 2009ZX10004-306 and 2009ZX10004-213).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDi, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorShen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHao, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPickerill, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:31:15Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:31:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Virology, 2011, v. 50 n. 3, p. 235-239en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1386-6532en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135282-
dc.description.abstractBackground: A large number of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infections were localized in school populations. Objectives: To describe the epidemiology, clinical features and risk factors associated with an outbreak that occurred at a vocational boarding school in Guangzhou, P.R. China. Study design: Data were collected prospectively and retrospectively through the use of on-site doctors and a post-outbreak survey and blood collection. The survey was used to confirm symptoms, and to investigate a series of flu-related factors such as dormitory conditions, health habits, vaccine history and population contact history. Blood samples were taken for serological analysis. Pandemic H1N1 infection was initially confirmed by a real-time RT-PCR assay. Following the identification of the outbreak by the Guangzhou CDC on September 4, cases were diagnosed symptomatically and retrospectively by serological analysis using the hemagglutination inhibition assay and a neutralization assay. Results: The infection rate was 32% (505/1570) and the attack rate was 22.2% (349/1570). The asymptomatic infection rate was 9.9% (156/1570). Sharing a classroom (OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.62-2.91) and dormitory space (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.84-2.93) was associated with higher rates of infection. Opening windows for ventilation was the only control measure that significantly protected against infection. Conclusion: Social isolation and quarantine should be used to prevent the spread of infection. Ventilation and a control of air flow between classrooms and dorms should be implemented as possible. School closures may be effective if implemented early. © 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Virologyen_HK
dc.subject2009 pandemic H1N1en_HK
dc.subjectInfluenzaen_HK
dc.subjectOutbreaken_HK
dc.subjectSerological analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - blood-
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks-
dc.subject.meshHemagglutination Inhibition Tests-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - pathology - virology-
dc.titleEpidemiological investigation of an outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in a boarding school: Serological analysis of 1570 casesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZheng, B:bzheng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZheng, B=rp00353en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcv.2010.11.012en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21195022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79851513639en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros188641en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79851513639&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume50en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage235en_HK
dc.identifier.epage239en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287229500012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, T=35285929400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Y=36961304600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDi, B=6602190900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=12139650300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, J=35211914500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=39062498500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, X=36960952400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuan, J=35270373300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, J=36524136300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, K=24402715500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, E=7102537056en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, Y=36961465100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHao, A=34871976300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, X=36961129400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Y=36961494500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, J=36961440200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPickerill, S=9744379000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZheng, B=7201780588en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8676938-

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