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Article: Long-term evolution and transmission dynamics of swine influenza A virus
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TitleLong-term evolution and transmission dynamics of swine influenza A virus
 
AuthorsVijaykrishna, D4 1 2
Smith, GJD4 1 2
Pybus, OG6
Zhu, H1 4
Bhatt, S6
Poon, LLM1
Riley, S3
Bahl, J4 1 2
Ma, SK1
Cheung, CL1
Perera, RAPM1
Chen, H1 4
Shortridge, KF1 4
Webby, RJ5
Webster, RG1 5
Guan, Y1 4
Peiris, JSM1 3
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
 
CitationNature, 2011, v. 473 n. 7348, p. 519-522 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature10004
 
AbstractSwine influenza A viruses (SwIV) cause significant economic losses in animal husbandry as well as instances of human disease 1 and occasionally give rise to human pandemics 2, including that caused by the H1N1/2009 virus 3,4. The lack of systematic and longitudinal influenza surveillance in pigs has hampered attempts to reconstruct the origins of this pandemic 4. Most existing swine data were derived from opportunistic samples collected from diseased pigs in disparate geographical regions, not from prospective studies in defined locations, hence the evolutionary and transmission dynamics of SwIV are poorly understood. Here we quantify the epidemiological, genetic and antigenic dynamics of SwIV in Hong Kong using a data set of more than 650 SwIV isolates and more than 800 swine sera from 12 years of systematic surveillance in this region, supplemented with data stretching back 34 years. Intercontinental virus movement has led to reassortment and lineage replacement, creating an antigenically and genetically diverse virus population whose dynamics are quantitatively different from those previously observed for human influenza viruses. Our findings indicate that increased antigenic drift is associated with reassortment events and offer insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
 
DescriptionLetter
 
ISSN0028-0836
2012 Impact Factor: 38.597
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 14.747
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature10004
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000290951300042
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)HHSN26600700005C
University Grants Commission of the Hong Kong SAR GovernmentAoE/M-12/06
Royal Society of London
UK COSI
Agency for Science, Technology and Research
Ministry of Health, Singapore
Funding Information:

This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) contract HHSN26600700005C and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Commission (grant AoE/M-12/06) of the Hong Kong SAR Government. We acknowledge the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department of Hong Kong for facilitating the study. We acknowledge support from The Royal Society of London (O.G.P.), UK COSI (S.B.), NIAID (G.J.D.S.), the Agency for Science, Technology and Research and the Ministry of Health, Singapore (D.V., G.J.D.S and J.B.). We thank C. Y. H. Leung for producing some of the ferret antisera used in this study.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, D
 
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJD
 
dc.contributor.authorPybus, OG
 
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorBhatt, S
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLM
 
dc.contributor.authorRiley, S
 
dc.contributor.authorBahl, J
 
dc.contributor.authorMa, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorShortridge, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorWebby, RJ
 
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RG
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:30:58Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:30:58Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractSwine influenza A viruses (SwIV) cause significant economic losses in animal husbandry as well as instances of human disease 1 and occasionally give rise to human pandemics 2, including that caused by the H1N1/2009 virus 3,4. The lack of systematic and longitudinal influenza surveillance in pigs has hampered attempts to reconstruct the origins of this pandemic 4. Most existing swine data were derived from opportunistic samples collected from diseased pigs in disparate geographical regions, not from prospective studies in defined locations, hence the evolutionary and transmission dynamics of SwIV are poorly understood. Here we quantify the epidemiological, genetic and antigenic dynamics of SwIV in Hong Kong using a data set of more than 650 SwIV isolates and more than 800 swine sera from 12 years of systematic surveillance in this region, supplemented with data stretching back 34 years. Intercontinental virus movement has led to reassortment and lineage replacement, creating an antigenically and genetically diverse virus population whose dynamics are quantitatively different from those previously observed for human influenza viruses. Our findings indicate that increased antigenic drift is associated with reassortment events and offer insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionLetter
 
dc.identifier.citationNature, 2011, v. 473 n. 7348, p. 519-522 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature10004
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9339224
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature10004
 
dc.identifier.eissn1476-4687
 
dc.identifier.epage522
 
dc.identifier.hkuros188540
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290951300042
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)HHSN26600700005C
University Grants Commission of the Hong Kong SAR GovernmentAoE/M-12/06
Royal Society of London
UK COSI
Agency for Science, Technology and Research
Ministry of Health, Singapore
Funding Information:

This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) contract HHSN26600700005C and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Commission (grant AoE/M-12/06) of the Hong Kong SAR Government. We acknowledge the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department of Hong Kong for facilitating the study. We acknowledge support from The Royal Society of London (O.G.P.), UK COSI (S.B.), NIAID (G.J.D.S.), the Agency for Science, Technology and Research and the Ministry of Health, Singapore (D.V., G.J.D.S and J.B.). We thank C. Y. H. Leung for producing some of the ferret antisera used in this study.

 
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836
2012 Impact Factor: 38.597
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 14.747
 
dc.identifier.issue7348
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21614079
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957602568
 
dc.identifier.spage519
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135273
 
dc.identifier.volume473
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofNature
 
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecular
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshOrthomyxoviridae Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary - virology
 
dc.subject.meshSwine - blood - virology
 
dc.subject.meshSwine Diseases - blood - epidemiology - transmission - virology
 
dc.titleLong-term evolution and transmission dynamics of swine influenza A virus
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore
  3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. Shantou University, Medical College (SUMC)
  5. St. Jude Children Research Hospital
  6. University of Oxford