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Article: Serum advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are associated with insulin resistance

TitleSerum advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are associated with insulin resistance
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/10009394
Citation
Diabetes/Metabolism Research And Reviews, 2011, v. 27 n. 5, p. 488-492 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In addition to the important role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, recent data suggest that advanced glycation end products can also impair insulin action in vitro. We have investigated whether circulating advanced glycation end products are associated with insulin resistance in human subjects independent of metabolic parameters. Methods: Two hundred and seven healthy non-obese non-diabetic subjects (97 male, 110 female) were recruited from the community. Serum levels of advanced glycation end products, adiponectin, malondialdehyde and high sensitivity C-reactive protein were assayed. Insulin resistance was determined by the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR). Results: Male subjects had significantly higher body mass index, waist circumference and lower adiponectin level than female subjects and were more insulin resistant. Serum advanced glycation end products (3.67 ± 1.15 unit/mL versus 3.23 ± 1.15, p < 0.05) and malondialdehyde levels (p < 0.05) were also higher in male than in female subjects. Serum advanced glycation end products correlated with HOMA-IR in both male (r = 0.32, p = 0.004) and female subjects (r = 0.28, p = 0.003). Serum adiponectin inversely correlated with HOMA-IR in female (r = - 0.38, p < 0.001) but not in male subjects. On multiple regression analysis, serum AGEs remained an independent determinant of HOMA-IR even after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, waist, smoking, adiponectin and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Conclusions: Formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products progress during normal ageing. We have demonstrated that the circulating level of advanced glycation end products is associated with insulin resistance even in non-obese, non-diabetic subjects independent of adiponectin. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135244
ISSN
2012 Impact Factor: 2.968
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.617
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, KCBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShiu, SWMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, Xen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:30:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:30:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes/Metabolism Research And Reviews, 2011, v. 27 n. 5, p. 488-492en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1520-7552en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135244-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In addition to the important role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, recent data suggest that advanced glycation end products can also impair insulin action in vitro. We have investigated whether circulating advanced glycation end products are associated with insulin resistance in human subjects independent of metabolic parameters. Methods: Two hundred and seven healthy non-obese non-diabetic subjects (97 male, 110 female) were recruited from the community. Serum levels of advanced glycation end products, adiponectin, malondialdehyde and high sensitivity C-reactive protein were assayed. Insulin resistance was determined by the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR). Results: Male subjects had significantly higher body mass index, waist circumference and lower adiponectin level than female subjects and were more insulin resistant. Serum advanced glycation end products (3.67 ± 1.15 unit/mL versus 3.23 ± 1.15, p < 0.05) and malondialdehyde levels (p < 0.05) were also higher in male than in female subjects. Serum advanced glycation end products correlated with HOMA-IR in both male (r = 0.32, p = 0.004) and female subjects (r = 0.28, p = 0.003). Serum adiponectin inversely correlated with HOMA-IR in female (r = - 0.38, p < 0.001) but not in male subjects. On multiple regression analysis, serum AGEs remained an independent determinant of HOMA-IR even after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, waist, smoking, adiponectin and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Conclusions: Formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products progress during normal ageing. We have demonstrated that the circulating level of advanced glycation end products is associated with insulin resistance even in non-obese, non-diabetic subjects independent of adiponectin. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/10009394en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviewsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdiponectin - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshC-Reactive Protein - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGlycosylation End Products, Advanced - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.titleSerum advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are associated with insulin resistanceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, KCB:kcbtan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, KCB=rp00402en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/dmrr.1188en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21337488-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960159996en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros188202en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960159996&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage488en_HK
dc.identifier.epage492en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292772900009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, KCB=8082703100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShiu, SWM=7005550652en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, Y=24073787400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, X=37027376000en_HK

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