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Article: Ethnic difference of clinical vertebral fracture risk
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TitleEthnic difference of clinical vertebral fracture risk
 
AuthorsBow, CH1
Cheung, E1
Cheung, CL1
Xiao, SM1
Loong, C3
Soong, C1
Tan, KC1
Luckey, MM4
Cauley, JA2
Fujiwara, S5
Kung, AWC1
 
KeywordsAsian
Chinese
Fracture incidence
Osteoporosis
Vertebral fracture
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer U K. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/198
 
CitationOsteoporosis International, 2012, v. 23 n. 3, p. 879-885 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-011-1627-9
 
AbstractVertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Data on the vertebral fracture risk in Asia remain sparse. This study observed that Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese populations have a less dramatic increase in hip fracture rates associated with age than Caucasians, but the vertebral fracture rates were higher, resulting in a high vertebral-to-hip fracture ratio. As a result, estimation of the absolute fracture risk for Asians may need to be readjusted for the higher clinical vertebral fracture rate. Introduction: Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Data on the vertebral fracture risk in Asia remain sparse. The aim of this study was to report the incidence of clinical vertebral fractures among the Chinese and to compare the vertebral-to-hip fracture risk to other ethnic groups. Methods: Four thousand, three hundred eighty-six community-dwelling Southern Chinese subjects (2,302 women and 1,810 men) aged 50 or above were recruited in the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study since 1995. Baseline demographic characteristics and medical history were obtained. Subjects were followed annually for fracture outcomes with a structured questionnaire and verified by the computerized patient information system of the Hospital Authority of the Hong Kong Government. Only non-traumatic incident hip fractures and clinical vertebral fractures that received medical attention were included in the analysis. The incidence rates of clinical vertebral fractures and hip fractures were determined and compared to the published data of Swedish Caucasian and Japanese populations. Results: The mean age at baseline was 62 ± 8.2 years for women and 68 ± 10.3 years for men. The average duration of follow-up was 4.0 ± 2.8 (range, 1 to 14) years for a total of 14,733 person-years for the whole cohort. The incidence rate for vertebral fracture was 194/100,000 person-years in men and 508/100,000 person-years in women, respectively. For subjects above the age of 65, the clinical vertebral fracture and hip fracture rates were 299/100,000 and 332/100,000 person-years, respectively, in men, and 594/100,000 and 379/100,000 person-years, respectively, in women. Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese populations have a less dramatic increase in hip fracture rates associated with age than Caucasians. At the age of 65 or above, the hip fracture rates for Asian (Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese) men and women were less than half of that in Caucasians, but the vertebral fracture rate was higher in Asians, resulting in a high vertebral-to-hip fracture ratio. Conclusions: The incidences of vertebral and hip fractures, as well as the vertebral-to-hip fracture ratios vary in Asians and Caucasians. Estimation of the absolute fracture risk for Asians may need to be readjusted for the higher clinical vertebral fracture rate. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
ISSN0937-941X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.165
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-011-1627-9
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3277693
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000300251200009
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong University Foundation
University of Hong Kong
KC Wong Education Foundation
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Bone Health Fund of the Hong Kong University Foundation and the Osteoporosis Research Fund of the University of Hong Kong. SMCR is partly supported by the KC Wong Education Foundation.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorBow, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, E
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorXiao, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorLoong, C
 
dc.contributor.authorSoong, C
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorLuckey, MM
 
dc.contributor.authorCauley, JA
 
dc.contributor.authorFujiwara, S
 
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWC
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:30:08Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:30:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractVertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Data on the vertebral fracture risk in Asia remain sparse. This study observed that Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese populations have a less dramatic increase in hip fracture rates associated with age than Caucasians, but the vertebral fracture rates were higher, resulting in a high vertebral-to-hip fracture ratio. As a result, estimation of the absolute fracture risk for Asians may need to be readjusted for the higher clinical vertebral fracture rate. Introduction: Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Data on the vertebral fracture risk in Asia remain sparse. The aim of this study was to report the incidence of clinical vertebral fractures among the Chinese and to compare the vertebral-to-hip fracture risk to other ethnic groups. Methods: Four thousand, three hundred eighty-six community-dwelling Southern Chinese subjects (2,302 women and 1,810 men) aged 50 or above were recruited in the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study since 1995. Baseline demographic characteristics and medical history were obtained. Subjects were followed annually for fracture outcomes with a structured questionnaire and verified by the computerized patient information system of the Hospital Authority of the Hong Kong Government. Only non-traumatic incident hip fractures and clinical vertebral fractures that received medical attention were included in the analysis. The incidence rates of clinical vertebral fractures and hip fractures were determined and compared to the published data of Swedish Caucasian and Japanese populations. Results: The mean age at baseline was 62 ± 8.2 years for women and 68 ± 10.3 years for men. The average duration of follow-up was 4.0 ± 2.8 (range, 1 to 14) years for a total of 14,733 person-years for the whole cohort. The incidence rate for vertebral fracture was 194/100,000 person-years in men and 508/100,000 person-years in women, respectively. For subjects above the age of 65, the clinical vertebral fracture and hip fracture rates were 299/100,000 and 332/100,000 person-years, respectively, in men, and 594/100,000 and 379/100,000 person-years, respectively, in women. Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese populations have a less dramatic increase in hip fracture rates associated with age than Caucasians. At the age of 65 or above, the hip fracture rates for Asian (Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese) men and women were less than half of that in Caucasians, but the vertebral fracture rate was higher in Asians, resulting in a high vertebral-to-hip fracture ratio. Conclusions: The incidences of vertebral and hip fractures, as well as the vertebral-to-hip fracture ratios vary in Asians and Caucasians. Estimation of the absolute fracture risk for Asians may need to be readjusted for the higher clinical vertebral fracture rate. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationOsteoporosis International, 2012, v. 23 n. 3, p. 879-885 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-011-1627-9
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9125803
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-011-1627-9
 
dc.identifier.eissn1433-2965
 
dc.identifier.epage885
 
dc.identifier.hkuros187292
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300251200009
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong University Foundation
University of Hong Kong
KC Wong Education Foundation
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Bone Health Fund of the Hong Kong University Foundation and the Osteoporosis Research Fund of the University of Hong Kong. SMCR is partly supported by the KC Wong Education Foundation.

 
dc.identifier.issn0937-941X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.165
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3277693
 
dc.identifier.pmid21461720
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857441688
 
dc.identifier.spage879
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135217
 
dc.identifier.volume23
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer U K. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/198
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofOsteoporosis International
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectAsian
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectFracture incidence
 
dc.subjectOsteoporosis
 
dc.subjectVertebral fracture
 
dc.titleEthnic difference of clinical vertebral fracture risk
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Cheung, E</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheung, CL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Xiao, SM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Loong, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Soong, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tan, KC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Luckey, MM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cauley, JA</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fujiwara, S</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Data on the vertebral fracture risk in Asia remain sparse. This study observed that Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese populations have a less dramatic increase in hip fracture rates associated with age than Caucasians, but the vertebral fracture rates were higher, resulting in a high vertebral-to-hip fracture ratio. As a result, estimation of the absolute fracture risk for Asians may need to be readjusted for the higher clinical vertebral fracture rate. Introduction: Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Data on the vertebral fracture risk in Asia remain sparse. The aim of this study was to report the incidence of clinical vertebral fractures among the Chinese and to compare the vertebral-to-hip fracture risk to other ethnic groups. Methods: Four thousand, three hundred eighty-six community-dwelling Southern Chinese subjects (2,302 women and 1,810 men) aged 50 or above were recruited in the Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study since 1995. Baseline demographic characteristics and medical history were obtained. Subjects were followed annually for fracture outcomes with a structured questionnaire and verified by the computerized patient information system of the Hospital Authority of the Hong Kong Government. Only non-traumatic incident hip fractures and clinical vertebral fractures that received medical attention were included in the analysis. The incidence rates of clinical vertebral fractures and hip fractures were determined and compared to the published data of Swedish Caucasian and Japanese populations. Results: The mean age at baseline was 62 &#177; 8.2 years for women and 68 &#177; 10.3 years for men. The average duration of follow-up was 4.0 &#177; 2.8 (range, 1 to 14) years for a total of 14,733 person-years for the whole cohort. The incidence rate for vertebral fracture was 194/100,000 person-years in men and 508/100,000 person-years in women, respectively. For subjects above the age of 65, the clinical vertebral fracture and hip fracture rates were 299/100,000 and 332/100,000 person-years, respectively, in men, and 594/100,000 and 379/100,000 person-years, respectively, in women. Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese populations have a less dramatic increase in hip fracture rates associated with age than Caucasians. At the age of 65 or above, the hip fracture rates for Asian (Hong Kong Chinese and Japanese) men and women were less than half of that in Caucasians, but the vertebral fracture rate was higher in Asians, resulting in a high vertebral-to-hip fracture ratio. Conclusions: The incidences of vertebral and hip fractures, as well as the vertebral-to-hip fracture ratios vary in Asians and Caucasians. Estimation of the absolute fracture risk for Asians may need to be readjusted for the higher clinical vertebral fracture rate. &#169; 2011 The Author(s).</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health
  3. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  4. St. Barnabas Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Disease Center
  5. Radiation Effects Research Foundation Hiroshima