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Article: The Chinese-version of the CARE Measure reliably differentiates between doctors in primary care: A cross-sectional study in Hong Kong

TitleThe Chinese-version of the CARE Measure reliably differentiates between doctors in primary care: A cross-sectional study in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCARE Measure
consultations
empathy
Hong Kong China
primary care
reliability
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcfampract/
Citation
Bmc Family Practice, 2011, v. 12 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure is a widely used patient-rated experience measure which has recently been translated into Chinese and has undergone preliminary qualitative and quantitative validation. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability of the Chinese-version of the CARE Measure in reliably differentiating between doctors in a primary care setting in Hong Kong. Methods: Data were collected from 984 primary care patients attending 20 doctors with differing levels of training in family medicine in 5 public clinics in Hong Kong. The acceptability of the Chinese-CARE measure to patients was assessed. The reliability of the measure in discriminating effectively between doctors was analysed by Generalisability- theory (G-Theory). Results: The items in the Chinese-CARE measure were regarded as important by patients and there were few 'not applicable' responses. The measure showed high internal reliability (coefficient 0.95) and effectively differentiated between doctors with only 15-20 patient ratings per doctor (inter-rater reliability > 0.8). Doctors' mean CARE measure scores varied widely, ranging from 24.1 to 45.9 (maximum possible score 50) with a mean of 34.6. CARE Measure scores were positively correlated with level of training in family medicine (Spearman's rho 0.493, p < 0.05). Conclusion: These data demonstrate the acceptability, feasibility and reliability of using the Chinese-CARE Measure in primary care in Hong Kong to differentiate between doctors interpersonal competencies. Training in family medicine appears to enhance these key interpersonal skills. © 2011 Mercer et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135191
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.641
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.978
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Faculty of Medicine
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The authors gratefully acknowledge the doctors, patients and interviewers who participated in the study. The authors would also like to express the appreciation to the Direct Grant for Research, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong for funding this study.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMercer, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, CSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, FWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, FYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SYSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:29:40Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Family Practice, 2011, v. 12en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2296en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135191-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure is a widely used patient-rated experience measure which has recently been translated into Chinese and has undergone preliminary qualitative and quantitative validation. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability of the Chinese-version of the CARE Measure in reliably differentiating between doctors in a primary care setting in Hong Kong. Methods: Data were collected from 984 primary care patients attending 20 doctors with differing levels of training in family medicine in 5 public clinics in Hong Kong. The acceptability of the Chinese-CARE measure to patients was assessed. The reliability of the measure in discriminating effectively between doctors was analysed by Generalisability- theory (G-Theory). Results: The items in the Chinese-CARE measure were regarded as important by patients and there were few 'not applicable' responses. The measure showed high internal reliability (coefficient 0.95) and effectively differentiated between doctors with only 15-20 patient ratings per doctor (inter-rater reliability > 0.8). Doctors' mean CARE measure scores varied widely, ranging from 24.1 to 45.9 (maximum possible score 50) with a mean of 34.6. CARE Measure scores were positively correlated with level of training in family medicine (Spearman's rho 0.493, p < 0.05). Conclusion: These data demonstrate the acceptability, feasibility and reliability of using the Chinese-CARE Measure in primary care in Hong Kong to differentiate between doctors interpersonal competencies. Training in family medicine appears to enhance these key interpersonal skills. © 2011 Mercer et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcfampract/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Family Practiceen_HK
dc.rightsBMC Family Practice. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCARE Measureen_HK
dc.subjectconsultationsen_HK
dc.subjectempathyen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kong Chinaen_HK
dc.subjectprimary careen_HK
dc.subjectreliabilityen_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction-
dc.subject.meshPhysician-Patient Relations-
dc.subject.meshPhysicians, Primary Care-
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Health Care-
dc.titleThe Chinese-version of the CARE Measure reliably differentiates between doctors in primary care: A cross-sectional study in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFung, CSC:cfsc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFung, CSC=rp01330en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2296-12-43en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21631927-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3123195-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957653107en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186490en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79957653107&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292051600001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMercer, SW=7005913632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, CSC=26028834900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, FWK=26643801700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, FYY=8406518400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SYS=7404590959en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurphy, D=16231248700en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9410964-

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