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Article: Attitudes and child abuse reporting behaviours among Hong Kong GPs

TitleAttitudes and child abuse reporting behaviours among Hong Kong GPs
Authors
KeywordsAbuse reporting
Child abuse
GP
Hong Kong
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Family Practice, 2011, v. 28 n. 2, p. 195-201 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. GPs are often the first contact for injured children and hence play a crucial role in early identification and intervention of child abuse cases in the community. Objectives. To investigate Hong Kong GPs' attitudes and behaviours towards child abuse reporting and their opinions on the introduction of a mandatory reporting system. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2006 among GPs who were attending or had attended a local postgraduate family medicine course. Results. One hundred and seventy-one GPs participated in this study, among which only 8.9% received formal child abuse training. Only 35.8% of those GPs who had encountered suspected cases reported every case. GPs who considered reporting could produce more harm than good to the family or child, who concerned about maintaining anonymity and who were reluctant to get involved with legal system were less likely to make a report [odds ratio (OR) 0.21-0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.11, 0.67-0.86]. 'Concern on own anonymity' was the only significant independent predictor for reporting (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.11-10.87). Despite the low satisfaction with the present reporting system, 67.3% would not support the introduction of a mandatory reporting system. Logistic regression showed previous training could predict supportive attitude towards mandatory reporting (OR 4.84, 95% CI 1.01-23.27). Conclusions. This study shows low reporting behaviour among Hong Kong GPs. The major barriers to report are identified and can only be addressed by education and a carefully designed support system for GPs. Further research engaging a multidisciplinary approach is required to work towards an optimally beneficial system for the children. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135183
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.022
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.048
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The School of Public Health Grant at The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We thank The School of Public Health Grant at The Chinese University of Hong Kong that supports the remuneration (HK$ 4000) for survey participants.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, CSKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:29:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:29:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFamily Practice, 2011, v. 28 n. 2, p. 195-201en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0263-2136en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135183-
dc.description.abstractBackground. GPs are often the first contact for injured children and hence play a crucial role in early identification and intervention of child abuse cases in the community. Objectives. To investigate Hong Kong GPs' attitudes and behaviours towards child abuse reporting and their opinions on the introduction of a mandatory reporting system. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2006 among GPs who were attending or had attended a local postgraduate family medicine course. Results. One hundred and seventy-one GPs participated in this study, among which only 8.9% received formal child abuse training. Only 35.8% of those GPs who had encountered suspected cases reported every case. GPs who considered reporting could produce more harm than good to the family or child, who concerned about maintaining anonymity and who were reluctant to get involved with legal system were less likely to make a report [odds ratio (OR) 0.21-0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.11, 0.67-0.86]. 'Concern on own anonymity' was the only significant independent predictor for reporting (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.11-10.87). Despite the low satisfaction with the present reporting system, 67.3% would not support the introduction of a mandatory reporting system. Logistic regression showed previous training could predict supportive attitude towards mandatory reporting (OR 4.84, 95% CI 1.01-23.27). Conclusions. This study shows low reporting behaviour among Hong Kong GPs. The major barriers to report are identified and can only be addressed by education and a carefully designed support system for GPs. Further research engaging a multidisciplinary approach is required to work towards an optimally beneficial system for the children. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Practiceen_HK
dc.subjectAbuse reportingen_HK
dc.subjectChild abuseen_HK
dc.subjectGPen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshGeneral Practitioners - psychology - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshMandatory Reporting-
dc.subject.meshPunishment - psychology-
dc.titleAttitudes and child abuse reporting behaviours among Hong Kong GPsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0263-2136&volume=28&issue=2&spage=195&epage=201&date=2011&atitle=Attitudes+and+child+abuse+reporting+behaviours+among+Hong+Kong+GPs-
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW:wongwcw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/fampra/cmq096en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21078823-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953154080en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186461en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953154080&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage195en_HK
dc.identifier.epage201en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288798900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, PWS=15769574300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WCW=25230779000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CSK=7404394105en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, A=8305464500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9095979-

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