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Article: Using illness scripts to teach clinical reasoning skills to medical students

TitleUsing illness scripts to teach clinical reasoning skills to medical students
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSociety of Teachers of Family Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.stfm.org/publications/familymedicine/index.cfm
Citation
Family Medicine, 2010, v. 42 n. 4, p. 255-261 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Objectives: Most medical students learn clinical reasoning skills informally during clinical rotations that have varying quality of supervision. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine if a workshop that uses "illness scripts" could improve students' clinical reasoning skills when making diagnoses of patients portrayed in written scenarios. Methods: In 2007-2008, 53 fourth-year medical students were randomly assigned to either a family medicine (intervention) or psychiatry (control) clerkship at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Students in the intervention group participated in a 3-hour workshop on clinical reasoning that used illness scripts. The workshop was conducted with small-group teaching using a Web-based set of clinical reasoning problems, individualized feedback, and demonstration of tutors' reasoning aloud. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed using the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) and the measurement of individual students' performance in solving clinical reasoning problems (CRP). Results: The postintervention overall DTI scores between groups were similar (mean difference 0, 95% confidence interval [CI]= -7.4 to 7.4). However, the total scores on the CRP assessment were 14% (95% CI=8% to 21%) higher in the intervention group than in controls. Conclusion: A workshop on illness scripts may have some benefit for improving diagnostic performance in clinical reasoning problems.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135179
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.981
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.453
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJoynt, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, AKTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, AMHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGroves, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorVlantis, ACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, RCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, CSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAun, CSTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:29:33Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:29:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFamily Medicine, 2010, v. 42 n. 4, p. 255-261en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0742-3225en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135179-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objectives: Most medical students learn clinical reasoning skills informally during clinical rotations that have varying quality of supervision. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine if a workshop that uses "illness scripts" could improve students' clinical reasoning skills when making diagnoses of patients portrayed in written scenarios. Methods: In 2007-2008, 53 fourth-year medical students were randomly assigned to either a family medicine (intervention) or psychiatry (control) clerkship at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Students in the intervention group participated in a 3-hour workshop on clinical reasoning that used illness scripts. The workshop was conducted with small-group teaching using a Web-based set of clinical reasoning problems, individualized feedback, and demonstration of tutors' reasoning aloud. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed using the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) and the measurement of individual students' performance in solving clinical reasoning problems (CRP). Results: The postintervention overall DTI scores between groups were similar (mean difference 0, 95% confidence interval [CI]= -7.4 to 7.4). However, the total scores on the CRP assessment were 14% (95% CI=8% to 21%) higher in the intervention group than in controls. Conclusion: A workshop on illness scripts may have some benefit for improving diagnostic performance in clinical reasoning problems.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety of Teachers of Family Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.stfm.org/publications/familymedicine/index.cfm en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical - methods-
dc.subject.meshFamily Practice-
dc.subject.meshProblem Solving - physiology-
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical-
dc.subject.meshTeaching - methods-
dc.titleUsing illness scripts to teach clinical reasoning skills to medical studentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFung, CSC:cfsc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFung, CSC=rp01330en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid20373168-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950642666en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186417en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950642666&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage255en_HK
dc.identifier.epage261en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278937700013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, A=24534808200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJoynt, GM=7005588815en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AKT=35975193100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, AMH=7402675188en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGroves, M=16022085100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVlantis, AC=35585515400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, RCW=8151571700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, CSC=26028834900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAun, CST=7004871621en_HK

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