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Article: Socioeconomic influences at different life stages on health in Guangzhou, China
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TitleSocioeconomic influences at different life stages on health in Guangzhou, China
 
AuthorsElwellSutton, TM1
Jiang, CQ3
Zhang, WS3
Cheng, KK2
Lam, TH1
Leung, GM1
Schooling, CM1
 
KeywordsChina
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
Health inequalities
Life course
Metabolic syndrome
Self-rated health
Socioeconomic status
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
 
CitationSocial Science And Medicine, 2011, v. 72 n. 11, p. 1884-1892 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.03.041
 
AbstractIn long-term developed countries socioeconomic position across the life course is positively associated with health. We examined these associations in a developing country with a history of efforts to reorganize the social hierarchy. Taking a life course perspective, we used multi-variable logistic regression to assess the association of socioeconomic disadvantage at four life stages (measured by parental possessions, education, longest-held occupation and current household income) with self-rated health, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and metabolic syndrome in 20,086 Chinese adults aged ≥50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2005-2008). Model comparisons were used to determine whether the number of exposures to disadvantage (accumulation of risk) was more important than the life stage of exposure (critical periods).Socioeconomic disadvantage across the life course was associated with poor self-rated health, COPD and, in women only, with metabolic syndrome. Adjusting for adult health-related behavior (smoking, alcohol use and physical exercise) altered these associations very little. Associations between socioeconomic disadvantage and health in this Southern Chinese population were broadly similar to those found in Western countries in terms of the accumulation of disadvantage across the life course. However, longest-held occupation was not independently associated with adult health and socioeconomic disadvantage was not associated with metabolic syndrome in men. This suggests that the mechanisms linking socioeconomic position to health in China may be different from those in Western populations and may require context-specific policy interventions. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0277-9536
2012 Impact Factor: 2.733
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.513
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.03.041
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000292676100018
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Cohort Study investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: WS Zhang, M Cao, T Zhu, B Liu, CQ Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: CM Schooling, SM McGhee, R Fielding, GM Leung, TH Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P Adab, GN Thomas, KK Cheng (Co-PI). The work was supported by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, and the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, UK.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorElwellSutton, TM
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM
 
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-13T01:21:45Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-13T01:21:45Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractIn long-term developed countries socioeconomic position across the life course is positively associated with health. We examined these associations in a developing country with a history of efforts to reorganize the social hierarchy. Taking a life course perspective, we used multi-variable logistic regression to assess the association of socioeconomic disadvantage at four life stages (measured by parental possessions, education, longest-held occupation and current household income) with self-rated health, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and metabolic syndrome in 20,086 Chinese adults aged ≥50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2005-2008). Model comparisons were used to determine whether the number of exposures to disadvantage (accumulation of risk) was more important than the life stage of exposure (critical periods).Socioeconomic disadvantage across the life course was associated with poor self-rated health, COPD and, in women only, with metabolic syndrome. Adjusting for adult health-related behavior (smoking, alcohol use and physical exercise) altered these associations very little. Associations between socioeconomic disadvantage and health in this Southern Chinese population were broadly similar to those found in Western countries in terms of the accumulation of disadvantage across the life course. However, longest-held occupation was not independently associated with adult health and socioeconomic disadvantage was not associated with metabolic syndrome in men. This suggests that the mechanisms linking socioeconomic position to health in China may be different from those in Western populations and may require context-specific policy interventions. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSocial Science And Medicine, 2011, v. 72 n. 11, p. 1884-1892 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.03.041
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9180168
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.03.041
 
dc.identifier.epage1892
 
dc.identifier.hkuros186106
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292676100018
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Cohort Study investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: WS Zhang, M Cao, T Zhu, B Liu, CQ Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: CM Schooling, SM McGhee, R Fielding, GM Leung, TH Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P Adab, GN Thomas, KK Cheng (Co-PI). The work was supported by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, and the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, UK.

 
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536
2012 Impact Factor: 2.733
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.513
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21550152
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79958708013
 
dc.identifier.spage1884
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134732
 
dc.identifier.volume72
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Science and Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChina
 
dc.subjectChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
 
dc.subjectHealth inequalities
 
dc.subjectLife course
 
dc.subjectMetabolic syndrome
 
dc.subjectSelf-rated health
 
dc.subjectSocioeconomic status
 
dc.titleSocioeconomic influences at different life stages on health in Guangzhou, China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. University of Birmingham
  3. Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital