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Article: Early life infections and onset of puberty: Evidence from hong kong's children of 1997 birth cohort

TitleEarly life infections and onset of puberty: Evidence from hong kong's children of 1997 birth cohort
Authors
Keywordschild
cohort studies
infant
infection
puberty
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2011, v. 173 n. 12, p. 1440-1452 How to Cite?
AbstractAs economic development increases, puberty occurs at younger ages, and this could contribute to an increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and hormone-related cancers. The factors that determine pubertal timing are poorly understood. The growth axis that is active during puberty is active in the first 6 months of life and interacts with the immune system. The authors examined whether prior infections, proxied by number of hospital admissions for infections at different ages, were associated with age at pubertal onset (Tanner stage II) using interval-censored regression in the Children of 1997 cohort, which is a population-representative Chinese birth cohort (n = 7,527). Mediation by growth was also examined. Girls, but not boys, who were hospitalized for infections at least twice in the first 6 months of life experienced pubertal onset about 8 months later (mean = 10.3 years, time ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.12) than did those without such hospitalizations (mean = 9.6 years) after adjustment for infant characteristics and socioeconomic position (sex interaction: P = 0.02). There were no such associations for infections at 6 months to ≤8 years of age. Growth did not mediate the association. Early infectious morbidity in girls may be associated with later puberty, perhaps via suppression of the gonadotropic axis. The lowering of the number of infections in early life that accompanies economic development could be an additional factor that contributes to earlier puberty. © 2011 The Author.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134729
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of the Special Administrative Region, China216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund03040771
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong04050172
06060592
Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme of Public Health, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was a substudy of the Children of 1997 birth cohort, which was initially supported by the Health Care and Promotion Fund, Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of the Special Administrative Region, China (grant 216106). Since 2005, the birth cohort study has been funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund (grant 03040771) and the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong (grants 04050172 and 06060592), Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, and the University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme of Public Health, University of Hong Kong.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T08:32:07Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-12T08:32:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 2011, v. 173 n. 12, p. 1440-1452en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134729-
dc.description.abstractAs economic development increases, puberty occurs at younger ages, and this could contribute to an increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and hormone-related cancers. The factors that determine pubertal timing are poorly understood. The growth axis that is active during puberty is active in the first 6 months of life and interacts with the immune system. The authors examined whether prior infections, proxied by number of hospital admissions for infections at different ages, were associated with age at pubertal onset (Tanner stage II) using interval-censored regression in the Children of 1997 cohort, which is a population-representative Chinese birth cohort (n = 7,527). Mediation by growth was also examined. Girls, but not boys, who were hospitalized for infections at least twice in the first 6 months of life experienced pubertal onset about 8 months later (mean = 10.3 years, time ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.12) than did those without such hospitalizations (mean = 9.6 years) after adjustment for infant characteristics and socioeconomic position (sex interaction: P = 0.02). There were no such associations for infections at 6 months to ≤8 years of age. Growth did not mediate the association. Early infectious morbidity in girls may be associated with later puberty, perhaps via suppression of the gonadotropic axis. The lowering of the number of infections in early life that accompanies economic development could be an additional factor that contributes to earlier puberty. © 2011 The Author.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectchilden_HK
dc.subjectcohort studiesen_HK
dc.subjectinfanten_HK
dc.subjectinfectionen_HK
dc.subjectpubertyen_HK
dc.titleEarly life infections and onset of puberty: Evidence from hong kong's children of 1997 birth cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0002-9262&volume=173&issue=12&spage=1440&epage=1452&date=2011&atitle=Early+life+infections+and+onset+of+puberty:+evidence+from+Hong+Kong%27s+children+of+1997+birth+cohort-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwr028en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21558410-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79958778436en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186092-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79958778436&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume173en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1440en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1452en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1476-6256-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291488700012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.f100011869956-
dc.relation.projectImpact of breastfeeding on hospitalizations from infectious diseases in Hong Kong Chinese children up to eight years of age-
dc.relation.projectShort- and medium-term outcomes of accelerated infant growth in Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort-
dc.relation.projectInfectious illness and secondhand smoke exposure in utero and during the first 8 years of life-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, MK=12806220300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9483730-

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