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Article: The ever-expanding diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

TitleThe ever-expanding diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus
Authors
KeywordsArteriviruses
Asia
Europe
Evolution
Hog production
North America
Phylogenetics
PRRS
Recombination
RNA virus
Swine
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/virusres
Citation
Virus Research, 2010, v. 154 n. 1-2, p. 18-30 How to Cite?
AbstractPorcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus appeared 20 years ago as the cause of a new disease in swine. Today PRRS is the most significant swine disease worldwide in spite of intensive immunological interventions. The virus showed remarkable genetic variation with two geographically distinct genotypes at the time of its discovery, indicating the possibility of prolonged evolutionary divergence prior to its appearance as a swine pathogen. Since then, both type 1 and type 2 have spread geographically, radiated genetically, and acquired new phenotypic characteristics, especially increased virulence. Here, we explore various hypotheses that might account for rapid expansion and diversification of PRRSV, including mechanisms specific to PRRSV and other arteriviruses, cellular modification processes, and immunological selection. Phylogenetic analysis of PRRSV has provided a broadly applicable means to relate diverse isolates, but it does not explain biological variation in virulence or immunological cross-protection. We present other methods of classification and review their limitations. Major questions about PRRSV remain unanswered despite intensive investigation, suggesting that the interaction of PRRSV with pigs involves novel biological processes that may be relevant to other RNA virus and host interactions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134724
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.259
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service2004-35605-14197
2008-55620-19132
University of Hong Kong
Polish Ministry of Science and Higher EducationNN308265136
EU245141
FA902
Funding Information:

The work and ideas presented here were generated in part with support by the PRRS Coordinated Agricultural Project funded through USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, grant numbers 2004-35605-14197 and 2008-55620-19132, the Strategic Research Theme of Infection and Immunology from The University of Hong Kong, the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education no. NN308265136, EU FP7 grant no. 245141, and EU COST Action FA902.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMurtaugh, MPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStadejek, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbrahante, JEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, TTYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, FCCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T07:32:11Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-12T07:32:11Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationVirus Research, 2010, v. 154 n. 1-2, p. 18-30en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0168-1702en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134724-
dc.description.abstractPorcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus appeared 20 years ago as the cause of a new disease in swine. Today PRRS is the most significant swine disease worldwide in spite of intensive immunological interventions. The virus showed remarkable genetic variation with two geographically distinct genotypes at the time of its discovery, indicating the possibility of prolonged evolutionary divergence prior to its appearance as a swine pathogen. Since then, both type 1 and type 2 have spread geographically, radiated genetically, and acquired new phenotypic characteristics, especially increased virulence. Here, we explore various hypotheses that might account for rapid expansion and diversification of PRRSV, including mechanisms specific to PRRSV and other arteriviruses, cellular modification processes, and immunological selection. Phylogenetic analysis of PRRSV has provided a broadly applicable means to relate diverse isolates, but it does not explain biological variation in virulence or immunological cross-protection. We present other methods of classification and review their limitations. Major questions about PRRSV remain unanswered despite intensive investigation, suggesting that the interaction of PRRSV with pigs involves novel biological processes that may be relevant to other RNA virus and host interactions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/virusresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofVirus Researchen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal title>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#-
dc.subjectArterivirusesen_HK
dc.subjectAsiaen_HK
dc.subjectEuropeen_HK
dc.subjectEvolutionen_HK
dc.subjectHog productionen_HK
dc.subjectNorth Americaen_HK
dc.subjectPhylogeneticsen_HK
dc.subjectPRRSen_HK
dc.subjectRecombinationen_HK
dc.subjectRNA virusen_HK
dc.subjectSwineen_HK
dc.titleThe ever-expanding diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0168-1702&volume=154&issue=1-2&spage=18&epage=30&date=2010&atitle=The+ever-expanding+diversity+of+porcine+reproductive+and+respiratory+syndrome+virus-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TTY: ttylam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, FCC: fcleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TTY=rp01733en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, FCC=rp00731en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.virusres.2010.08.015en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20801173-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649316053en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186068-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649316053&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume154en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage18en_HK
dc.identifier.epage30en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285124600003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurtaugh, MP=7005137127en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStadejek, T=7004484127en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbrahante, JE=6507096336en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TTY=36775821700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, FCC=7103078633en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7840117-

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