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Conference Paper: Assessing students' integrative learning in biomedical engineering from the perspectives of structure, behavior, and function

TitleAssessing students' integrative learning in biomedical engineering from the perspectives of structure, behavior, and function
Authors
KeywordsBiomedical engineering education
Integrated learning
Learning sciences
Structure-behavior-function (SBF) framework
Issue Date2010
Citation
Proceedings - Frontiers In Education Conference, Fie, 2010, p. S1G1-S1G6 How to Cite?
AbstractLearning in biomedical engineering is highly interdisciplinary: students need to integrate concepts between engineering and life sciences, and be able to design and develop technologies with physiological considerations. In this study, biomedical engineering students' artifacts were analyzed in detail according to the structure-behavior-framework (SBF) framework. The SBF framework has been investigated by educational researchers and learning scientists; in particular, the behavioral and functional dimensions were proved to be related to a sophisticated level of understanding of complex systems. Existing research results also indicate that experts (or expert-like learners) show a deeper understanding of the behavioral and functional aspects of systems. In the current study, a 5-level scale comprising structural, behavioral, and functional dimensions of integrated learning was constructed to assess student learning in a biomedical engineering project course. Our results indicate that high achievers and low achievers were different in the behavioral and functional dimensions. The results also indicate significant relationships between behavioral and functional dimensions of learning and students' final course performance. These findings align with existing results in cognitive science and learning sciences on expert-novice differences, which help connecting engineering educational inquiries to the rich body of literature and findings in human learning. © 2010 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134688
ISBN
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-05T08:24:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-05T08:24:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings - Frontiers In Education Conference, Fie, 2010, p. S1G1-S1G6en_HK
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4244-6261-2-
dc.identifier.issn1539-4565en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134688-
dc.description.abstractLearning in biomedical engineering is highly interdisciplinary: students need to integrate concepts between engineering and life sciences, and be able to design and develop technologies with physiological considerations. In this study, biomedical engineering students' artifacts were analyzed in detail according to the structure-behavior-framework (SBF) framework. The SBF framework has been investigated by educational researchers and learning scientists; in particular, the behavioral and functional dimensions were proved to be related to a sophisticated level of understanding of complex systems. Existing research results also indicate that experts (or expert-like learners) show a deeper understanding of the behavioral and functional aspects of systems. In the current study, a 5-level scale comprising structural, behavioral, and functional dimensions of integrated learning was constructed to assess student learning in a biomedical engineering project course. Our results indicate that high achievers and low achievers were different in the behavioral and functional dimensions. The results also indicate significant relationships between behavioral and functional dimensions of learning and students' final course performance. These findings align with existing results in cognitive science and learning sciences on expert-novice differences, which help connecting engineering educational inquiries to the rich body of literature and findings in human learning. © 2010 IEEE.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIEen_HK
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering educationen_HK
dc.subjectIntegrated learningen_HK
dc.subjectLearning sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectStructure-behavior-function (SBF) frameworken_HK
dc.titleAssessing students' integrative learning in biomedical engineering from the perspectives of structure, behavior, and functionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YY: yychan8@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH: alfred.yu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CKK: ckkchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YY=rp00894en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CKK=rp00891en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/FIE.2010.5673660en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78751513555en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78751513555&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.spageS1G1en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS1G6en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YY=7403676264en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, ACH=8699317700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CKK=27170802100en_HK

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