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Article: Orthographic knowledge important in comprehending elementary Chinese text by users of alphasyllabaries
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TitleOrthographic knowledge important in comprehending elementary Chinese text by users of alphasyllabaries
 
AuthorsLeong, CK1 3
Tse, SK2
Loh, KY2
Ki, WW2
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02702711.asp
 
CitationReading Psychology, 2011, v. 32 n. 3, p. 237-271 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02702711.2010.495605
 
AbstractOrthographic knowledge in Chinese was hypothesized to affect elementary Chinese text comprehension (four essays) by 80 twelve-year-old ethnic alphasyllabary language users compared with 74 native Chinese speakers at similar reading level. This was tested with two rapid automatized naming tasks; two working memory tasks; three orthographic knowledge tasks in Chinese; and equivalent tasks in English. Multivariate analyses of covariance showed that the two groups were differentiated on most of the linguistic and cognitive tasks. Confirmatory factor analyses found four factors as hypothesized: text comprehension, verbal working memory, orthographic knowledge in Chinese, and orthographic knowledge in English. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that orthographic knowledge in Chinese explained a considerable amount of individual variation in elementary Chinese text comprehension. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
 
ISSN0270-2711
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.355
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02702711.2010.495605
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeong, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorLoh, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorKi, WW
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:33:06Z
 
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:33:06Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractOrthographic knowledge in Chinese was hypothesized to affect elementary Chinese text comprehension (four essays) by 80 twelve-year-old ethnic alphasyllabary language users compared with 74 native Chinese speakers at similar reading level. This was tested with two rapid automatized naming tasks; two working memory tasks; three orthographic knowledge tasks in Chinese; and equivalent tasks in English. Multivariate analyses of covariance showed that the two groups were differentiated on most of the linguistic and cognitive tasks. Confirmatory factor analyses found four factors as hypothesized: text comprehension, verbal working memory, orthographic knowledge in Chinese, and orthographic knowledge in English. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that orthographic knowledge in Chinese explained a considerable amount of individual variation in elementary Chinese text comprehension. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationReading Psychology, 2011, v. 32 n. 3, p. 237-271 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02702711.2010.495605
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9329395
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02702711.2010.495605
 
dc.identifier.epage271
 
dc.identifier.hkuros185694
 
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2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.355
 
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dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134600
 
dc.identifier.volume32
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02702711.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofReading Psychology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleOrthographic knowledge important in comprehending elementary Chinese text by users of alphasyllabaries
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Saskatchewan
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong