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Conference Paper: Efficacy of Qiqong in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome: A prospective randomized controlled trial

TitleEfficacy of Qiqong in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome: A prospective randomized controlled trial
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherL. Erlbaum Associates. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
The 32nd Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2011), Washington, DC., 27-30 April 2011. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2011, v. 41 suppl.1, p. S224 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with unknown etiology is a common health problem, but is usually neglected. There is a controversy in the definition and treatment of CFS.Western drugs for CFS have many side-effects and little clinical benefit. Only graded exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy have evidence of efficacy. Qigong is a traditional Chinese movement exercise including meditation, which focuses on the balance between yin and yang, as well as regulating the circulation of qi (vital energy in the body) to attain holistic health. Few large studies on Qigong and CFS have been conducted. This study was the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) study to assess the efficacy of Qigong as an alternative approach in the treatment of CFS. Methods: A RCTstudy for adult CFS patients was conducted with Qigong group (n= 56) and control group (n=58). Ten sessions (twice a week for 5 weeks) of Qigong exercise (WuXingPingHengGong) of 2 hours each was delivered by an experienced Taoist Qigong master (YLP). The primary outcomewas a change of Chalder’s Fatigue scale between baseline and post-intervention (T1 - T0). The secondary outcomes were Chinese Brief Fatigue Inventory (CBFI) and SF-12 Health Survey Questionnaire. Results: Two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics and other aspects at baseline. Mean (SD) of Chalder’s fatigue score at baseline and postintervention for Qigong group were 34.5 (9.0) and 23.3 (10.3), respectively, versus 35.8 (9.6) and 29.6 (10.7) for control group. The changes of Chalder’s fatigue (T1-T0) were −11.2 and −6.2 for Qigong and control groups respectively (p=0.004). There were also the improvements in terms of CBFI (- 1.6 vs - 0.5, p=0.004) and quality of life (SF-12 PCS: 5.5 vs 2.6, p=0.056; SF-12 MCS: 7.6 vs 1.5, p=0.003). No adverse events were observed. Conclusion: Qigong exercise may be a promising therapy for the treatment of CFS as an alternative approach.
DescriptionPoster Session D, D-127
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134596
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KTen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:32:37Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:32:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 32nd Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2011), Washington, DC., 27-30 April 2011. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2011, v. 41 suppl.1, p. S224en_US
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134596-
dc.descriptionPoster Session D, D-127-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with unknown etiology is a common health problem, but is usually neglected. There is a controversy in the definition and treatment of CFS.Western drugs for CFS have many side-effects and little clinical benefit. Only graded exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy have evidence of efficacy. Qigong is a traditional Chinese movement exercise including meditation, which focuses on the balance between yin and yang, as well as regulating the circulation of qi (vital energy in the body) to attain holistic health. Few large studies on Qigong and CFS have been conducted. This study was the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) study to assess the efficacy of Qigong as an alternative approach in the treatment of CFS. Methods: A RCTstudy for adult CFS patients was conducted with Qigong group (n= 56) and control group (n=58). Ten sessions (twice a week for 5 weeks) of Qigong exercise (WuXingPingHengGong) of 2 hours each was delivered by an experienced Taoist Qigong master (YLP). The primary outcomewas a change of Chalder’s Fatigue scale between baseline and post-intervention (T1 - T0). The secondary outcomes were Chinese Brief Fatigue Inventory (CBFI) and SF-12 Health Survey Questionnaire. Results: Two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics and other aspects at baseline. Mean (SD) of Chalder’s fatigue score at baseline and postintervention for Qigong group were 34.5 (9.0) and 23.3 (10.3), respectively, versus 35.8 (9.6) and 29.6 (10.7) for control group. The changes of Chalder’s fatigue (T1-T0) were −11.2 and −6.2 for Qigong and control groups respectively (p=0.004). There were also the improvements in terms of CBFI (- 1.6 vs - 0.5, p=0.004) and quality of life (SF-12 PCS: 5.5 vs 2.6, p=0.056; SF-12 MCS: 7.6 vs 1.5, p=0.003). No adverse events were observed. Conclusion: Qigong exercise may be a promising therapy for the treatment of CFS as an alternative approach.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherL. Erlbaum Associates. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.titleEfficacy of Qiqong in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome: A prospective randomized controlled trialen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JSM: chansm5@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KT: ericktl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, TH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, TH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12160-011-9263-3-
dc.identifier.hkuros185507en_US
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.1-
dc.identifier.spageS224-
dc.identifier.epageS224-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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