File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Factor structure and gender invariance of the Chinese General Self-Efficacy Scale among soon-to-be-aged adults

TitleFactor structure and gender invariance of the Chinese General Self-Efficacy Scale among soon-to-be-aged adults
Authors
KeywordsChinese General Self-Efficacy Scale
Confirmatory factor analysis
Factor structure
Gender invariance
Instrument validation
Psychometric properties
Soon-to-be-aged adults
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 2011, v. 67 n. 6, p. 1383-1392 How to Cite?
AbstractAim. The aim of the study was to examine the factor structure of the Chinese General Self-Efficacy Scale and gender invariance in the structure. Background. The General Self-Efficacy Scale was developed in 1981 and revised in 1995 to measure people's beliefs or expectations about their ability to perform tasks on their own across a wide range of demanding/novel situations. While the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale has been examined for adolescents and adults from clinical populations, its psychometric properties for community-dwelling Chinese soon-to-be-aged adults, who are in a transitional stage from adulthood to later life, have not been tested. Females have consistently reported a lower general self-efficacy level than males, but it is unclear whether the difference is a result of response bias of the inventory by gender. Method. A convenience sample of Chinese soon-to-be-aged adults (n=695) in 28 non-government organizations in Hong Kong completed the survey from March to May 2005. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure and multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis to test the gender invariance of the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale. Results. The proposed factor structure of the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale was an excellent fit to the overall data, and held equally well for both males and females, both genders demonstrating an equivalent pattern of factor loadings. The Cronbach alpha value was high (0·89). Conclusion. The Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy is a reliable and valid scale and both genders responded to it using the same framework and metric, thus allowing it to be used with confidence in non-clinical Chinese soon-to-be-aged adult samples. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134533
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong200511159032
Funding Information:

This research was funded by Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research of The University of Hong Kong (No: 200511159032).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:27:43Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:27:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Advanced Nursing, 2011, v. 67 n. 6, p. 1383-1392en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134533-
dc.description.abstractAim. The aim of the study was to examine the factor structure of the Chinese General Self-Efficacy Scale and gender invariance in the structure. Background. The General Self-Efficacy Scale was developed in 1981 and revised in 1995 to measure people's beliefs or expectations about their ability to perform tasks on their own across a wide range of demanding/novel situations. While the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale has been examined for adolescents and adults from clinical populations, its psychometric properties for community-dwelling Chinese soon-to-be-aged adults, who are in a transitional stage from adulthood to later life, have not been tested. Females have consistently reported a lower general self-efficacy level than males, but it is unclear whether the difference is a result of response bias of the inventory by gender. Method. A convenience sample of Chinese soon-to-be-aged adults (n=695) in 28 non-government organizations in Hong Kong completed the survey from March to May 2005. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure and multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis to test the gender invariance of the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale. Results. The proposed factor structure of the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale was an excellent fit to the overall data, and held equally well for both males and females, both genders demonstrating an equivalent pattern of factor loadings. The Cronbach alpha value was high (0·89). Conclusion. The Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy is a reliable and valid scale and both genders responded to it using the same framework and metric, thus allowing it to be used with confidence in non-clinical Chinese soon-to-be-aged adult samples. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectChinese General Self-Efficacy Scaleen_HK
dc.subjectConfirmatory factor analysisen_HK
dc.subjectFactor structureen_HK
dc.subjectGender invarianceen_HK
dc.subjectInstrument validationen_HK
dc.subjectPsychometric propertiesen_HK
dc.subjectSoon-to-be-aged adultsen_HK
dc.titleFactor structure and gender invariance of the Chinese General Self-Efficacy Scale among soon-to-be-aged adultsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0309-2402&volume=67&issue=6&spage=1383&epage=1392&date=2011&atitle=Factor+structure+and+gender+invariance+of+the+Chinese+General+Self-Efficacy+Scale+(CGSE)+among+soon-to-be-aged+adults-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, DYP: dorisl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, AY: angleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, DYP=rp00465en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, AY=rp00405en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05529.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21129011-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955727034en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185498en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955727034&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1383en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1392en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2648-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290398300021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, DYP=16304486500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, AY=7403012650en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9293705-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats