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Article: Physical activity measurement instruments for children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review
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TitlePhysical activity measurement instruments for children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review
 
AuthorsCapio, CM1
Sit, CHP1
Abernethy, B1
Rotor, ER2
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherMac Keith Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mackeith.co.uk/journal.html
 
CitationDevelopmental Medicine And Child Neurology, 2010, v. 52 n. 10, p. 908-916 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03737.x
 
AbstractAim: This paper is a systematic review of physical activity measurement instruments for field-based studies involving children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Database searches using PubMed Central, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PEDro located 12 research papers, identifying seven instruments that met the inclusion criteria of (1) having been developed for children aged 0 to 18 years, (2) having been used to evaluate a physical activity dimension, and (3) having been used in a field-based study involving children with CP. The instruments reviewed were the Activities Scale for Kids - Performance version (ASKp), the Canada Fitness Survey, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC), the Compendium of Physical Activities, the Physical Activity Questionnaire - Adolescents (PAQ-A), StepWatch, and the Uptimer. Second-round searches yielded 11 more papers, providing reliability and validity evidence for the instruments. Results: The instruments measure physical activity frequency, mode, domain, and duration. Although most instruments demonstrated adequate reliability and validity, only the ASKp and CAPE/PAC have established reliability and validity for children with physical disabilities; the Uptimer has established concurrent validity. No instrument measuring intensity in free-living has been validated or found reliable for children with CP. Interpretation: The findings suggest that further studies are needed to examine the methodological properties of physical activity measurement in children with CP. Combining subjective and objective instruments is recommended to achieve better understanding of physical activity participation. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.
 
DescriptionComment in Dev Med Child Neurol. 2011 Feb;53(2):191; author reply 192.
 
ISSN0012-1622
2013 Impact Factor: 3.292
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03737.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000281641800015
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCapio, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHP
 
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, B
 
dc.contributor.authorRotor, ER
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:25:57Z
 
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:25:57Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractAim: This paper is a systematic review of physical activity measurement instruments for field-based studies involving children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Database searches using PubMed Central, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PEDro located 12 research papers, identifying seven instruments that met the inclusion criteria of (1) having been developed for children aged 0 to 18 years, (2) having been used to evaluate a physical activity dimension, and (3) having been used in a field-based study involving children with CP. The instruments reviewed were the Activities Scale for Kids - Performance version (ASKp), the Canada Fitness Survey, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC), the Compendium of Physical Activities, the Physical Activity Questionnaire - Adolescents (PAQ-A), StepWatch, and the Uptimer. Second-round searches yielded 11 more papers, providing reliability and validity evidence for the instruments. Results: The instruments measure physical activity frequency, mode, domain, and duration. Although most instruments demonstrated adequate reliability and validity, only the ASKp and CAPE/PAC have established reliability and validity for children with physical disabilities; the Uptimer has established concurrent validity. No instrument measuring intensity in free-living has been validated or found reliable for children with CP. Interpretation: The findings suggest that further studies are needed to examine the methodological properties of physical activity measurement in children with CP. Combining subjective and objective instruments is recommended to achieve better understanding of physical activity participation. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionComment in Dev Med Child Neurol. 2011 Feb;53(2):191; author reply 192.
 
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental Medicine And Child Neurology, 2010, v. 52 n. 10, p. 908-916 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03737.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03737.x
 
dc.identifier.epage916
 
dc.identifier.hkuros185748
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281641800015
 
dc.identifier.issn0012-1622
2013 Impact Factor: 3.292
 
dc.identifier.issue10
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20646029
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956489237
 
dc.identifier.spage908
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134500
 
dc.identifier.volume52
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherMac Keith Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mackeith.co.uk/journal.html
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshActivities of Daily Living
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshCerebral Palsy - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires - standards
 
dc.titlePhysical activity measurement instruments for children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of the Philippines Manila