File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Parental death during childhood and adult cardiovascular risk in a developing country: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort study

TitleParental death during childhood and adult cardiovascular risk in a developing country: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort study
Authors
KeywordsBody height
Body mass
Cardiovascular risk
Childhood
China
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In observational studies from western countries childhood emotional adversity is usually associated with adult cardiovascular disease. These findings are open to contextual biases making evidence from other settings valuable. We examined the association of a potential marker of childhood emotional adversity with cardiovascular disease risk factors in a developing country. Methods: We used multivariable regression in cross-sectional analysis of older (≥50 years) men (n = 7,885) and women (n = 20,886) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003-8) to examine the adjusted association of early life (<18 years) parental death (none, one or two deaths) with blood pressure, fasting glucose, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and white blood cell count (WBC). We used seated height and delayed 10-word recall to assess content validity of parental death as a measure of childhood emotional adversity. We also examined whether associations varied by sex. Results: Early life parental death was associated with shorter age- and sex-adjusted seated height. It was also associated with lower 10-word recall score adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic position, leg length and lifestyle. Similarly, adjusted early life parental death was not associated with blood pressure, fasting glucose, LDL-cholesterol or HDL-cholesterol but was associated with lower BMI (-0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.62 to -0.19 for 2 compared with no early life parental deaths) and triglycerides. Associations varied by sex for WHR and WBC. Among men only, early life parental death was associated with lower WHR (-0.008, 95% CI -0.015 to -0.001) and WBC (-0.35 10 9/L, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.13). Conclusions: In a non-western population from a developing country, childhood emotional adversity was negatively associated with some cardiovascular risk factors, particularly among men. Our study suggests that some of the observed associations in western populations may be socially rather than biologically based or may be population specific. © 2011 Schooling et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134495
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

The study was funded by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, and the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China, and The University of Birmingham, UK. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:22:13Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:22:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134495-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In observational studies from western countries childhood emotional adversity is usually associated with adult cardiovascular disease. These findings are open to contextual biases making evidence from other settings valuable. We examined the association of a potential marker of childhood emotional adversity with cardiovascular disease risk factors in a developing country. Methods: We used multivariable regression in cross-sectional analysis of older (≥50 years) men (n = 7,885) and women (n = 20,886) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003-8) to examine the adjusted association of early life (<18 years) parental death (none, one or two deaths) with blood pressure, fasting glucose, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and white blood cell count (WBC). We used seated height and delayed 10-word recall to assess content validity of parental death as a measure of childhood emotional adversity. We also examined whether associations varied by sex. Results: Early life parental death was associated with shorter age- and sex-adjusted seated height. It was also associated with lower 10-word recall score adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic position, leg length and lifestyle. Similarly, adjusted early life parental death was not associated with blood pressure, fasting glucose, LDL-cholesterol or HDL-cholesterol but was associated with lower BMI (-0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.62 to -0.19 for 2 compared with no early life parental deaths) and triglycerides. Associations varied by sex for WHR and WBC. Among men only, early life parental death was associated with lower WHR (-0.008, 95% CI -0.015 to -0.001) and WBC (-0.35 10 9/L, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.13). Conclusions: In a non-western population from a developing country, childhood emotional adversity was negatively associated with some cardiovascular risk factors, particularly among men. Our study suggests that some of the observed associations in western populations may be socially rather than biologically based or may be population specific. © 2011 Schooling et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBody height-
dc.subjectBody mass-
dc.subjectCardiovascular risk-
dc.subjectChildhood-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleParental death during childhood and adult cardiovascular risk in a developing country: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1932-6203&volume=6&issue=5, article no. e19675&spage=&epage=&date=2011&atitle=Parental+death+during+childhood+and+adult+cardiovascular+risk+in+a+developing+country:+The+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+Study-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0019675en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21603607-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3095611-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956119106en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185620en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79956119106&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290656300017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, W=14833531400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=34876395100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats