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Article: Short or long sleep duration is associated with memory impairment in older chinese: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
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TitleShort or long sleep duration is associated with memory impairment in older chinese: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
 
AuthorsXu, L1
Jiang, CQ3
Lam, TH1
Liu, B3
Jin, YL3
Zhu, T3
Zhang, WS3
Cheng, KK2
Thomas, GN2
 
KeywordsInsomnia
Memory impairment
Napping
Sleep
Sleep duration
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
 
CitationSleep, 2011, v. 34 n. 5, p. 575-580 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractStudy Objectives: To examine the association between sleep-related factors and memory impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: Community-based study in Guangzhou, China. Participants: 28,670 older Chinese (20,776 women and 7,894 men) aged 50 to 85 years. Measurements and Results: Demographic and socioeconomic data, sleep-related factors, and cognitive function were collected by face-to-face interview. Potential confounders, such as employment and occupational status, smoking, alcohol and tea use, physical activity, self-rated health, anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose and lipids were measured. After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and delayed word recall test (DWRT) score, a validated measure of memory impairment, was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to ≥ 10 h were all ≤ 0.001). Compared to sleep duration of 7 h, the adjusted odds ratio for memory impairment from the sleep duration of 3 to 4 or ≥ 10 h was 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.56) and 1.52 (1.25-1.86), respectively. Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had significantly lower DWRT scores than those without (P ranged from < 0.001 to 0.01).Conclusions: Short or long sleep duration was an important sleep-related factor independently associated with memory impairment and may be a useful marker for increased risk of cognitive impairment in older people. © Copyright 2011 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.
 
ISSN0161-8105
2013 Impact Factor: 5.062
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.602
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3079936
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291145800007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorXu, L
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, B
 
dc.contributor.authorJin, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorZhu, T
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:22:12Z
 
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:22:12Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractStudy Objectives: To examine the association between sleep-related factors and memory impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: Community-based study in Guangzhou, China. Participants: 28,670 older Chinese (20,776 women and 7,894 men) aged 50 to 85 years. Measurements and Results: Demographic and socioeconomic data, sleep-related factors, and cognitive function were collected by face-to-face interview. Potential confounders, such as employment and occupational status, smoking, alcohol and tea use, physical activity, self-rated health, anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose and lipids were measured. After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and delayed word recall test (DWRT) score, a validated measure of memory impairment, was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to ≥ 10 h were all ≤ 0.001). Compared to sleep duration of 7 h, the adjusted odds ratio for memory impairment from the sleep duration of 3 to 4 or ≥ 10 h was 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.56) and 1.52 (1.25-1.86), respectively. Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had significantly lower DWRT scores than those without (P ranged from < 0.001 to 0.01).Conclusions: Short or long sleep duration was an important sleep-related factor independently associated with memory impairment and may be a useful marker for increased risk of cognitive impairment in older people. © Copyright 2011 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2011, v. 34 n. 5, p. 575-580 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage580
 
dc.identifier.hkuros185482
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291145800007
 
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105
2013 Impact Factor: 5.062
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.602
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3079936
 
dc.identifier.pmid21532950
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955555744
 
dc.identifier.spage575
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134493
 
dc.identifier.volume34
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofSleep
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectInsomnia
 
dc.subjectMemory impairment
 
dc.subjectNapping
 
dc.subjectSleep
 
dc.subjectSleep duration
 
dc.titleShort or long sleep duration is associated with memory impairment in older chinese: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Study Objectives: To examine the association between sleep-related factors and memory impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: Community-based study in Guangzhou, China. Participants: 28,670 older Chinese (20,776 women and 7,894 men) aged 50 to 85 years. Measurements and Results: Demographic and socioeconomic data, sleep-related factors, and cognitive function were collected by face-to-face interview. Potential confounders, such as employment and occupational status, smoking, alcohol and tea use, physical activity, self-rated health, anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose and lipids were measured. After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and delayed word recall test (DWRT) score, a validated measure of memory impairment, was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to &#8805; 10 h were all &#8804; 0.001). Compared to sleep duration of 7 h, the adjusted odds ratio for memory impairment from the sleep duration of 3 to 4 or &#8805; 10 h was 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.56) and 1.52 (1.25-1.86), respectively. Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had significantly lower DWRT scores than those without (P ranged from &lt; 0.001 to 0.01).Conclusions: Short or long sleep duration was an important sleep-related factor independently associated with memory impairment and may be a useful marker for increased risk of cognitive impairment in older people. &#169; Copyright 2011 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Birmingham
  3. Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital