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Article: Children exposed to child maltreatment and intimate partner violence: A study of co-occurrence among Hong Kong Chinese families

TitleChildren exposed to child maltreatment and intimate partner violence: A study of co-occurrence among Hong Kong Chinese families
Authors
KeywordsChild maltreatment
Co-occurrence
Corporal punishment
Intimate partner violence
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chiabuneg
Citation
Child Abuse And Neglect, 2011, v. 35 n. 7, p. 532-542 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study assessed the co-occurrence of child maltreatment and intimate partner violence (IPV) and examined the association between them. Method: The cross-sectional study recruited a population-based sample of 1,094 children aged 12-17 years in Hong Kong. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data from the children. The prevalence of occurrence of child abuse and neglect by parents and exposure to IPV in both the past year and lifetime was examined, and their correlates were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: The results show that 26% and 14.6% of child participants had been exposed to IPV physical assault, and 44.4% and 22.6% had been subjected to a parent's corporal punishment or to physical maltreatment from a parent in their lifetime and the year preceding the study, respectively. Among those families characterized by IPV, 54.4% and 46.5% were involved in child physical maltreatment over the child's lifetime and in the preceding year, respectively. Conclusions: Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that children exposed to IPV were at higher risk of being victims of neglect, corporal punishment, and physical maltreatment or severe physical maltreatment by their parents than children who were not exposed to IPV, even when child and parent demographic factors were controlled for. Practical implications: The higher risk of child physical maltreatment associated with IPV highlights the need for an integrated assessment to screen for the presence of multiple forms of family violence within the family, and for intervention to assess effective responses to both IPV and child maltreatment by child protective service workers and domestic violence agencies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134461
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.397
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.343
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:21:18Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:21:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChild Abuse And Neglect, 2011, v. 35 n. 7, p. 532-542en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0145-2134en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134461-
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the co-occurrence of child maltreatment and intimate partner violence (IPV) and examined the association between them. Method: The cross-sectional study recruited a population-based sample of 1,094 children aged 12-17 years in Hong Kong. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data from the children. The prevalence of occurrence of child abuse and neglect by parents and exposure to IPV in both the past year and lifetime was examined, and their correlates were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: The results show that 26% and 14.6% of child participants had been exposed to IPV physical assault, and 44.4% and 22.6% had been subjected to a parent's corporal punishment or to physical maltreatment from a parent in their lifetime and the year preceding the study, respectively. Among those families characterized by IPV, 54.4% and 46.5% were involved in child physical maltreatment over the child's lifetime and in the preceding year, respectively. Conclusions: Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that children exposed to IPV were at higher risk of being victims of neglect, corporal punishment, and physical maltreatment or severe physical maltreatment by their parents than children who were not exposed to IPV, even when child and parent demographic factors were controlled for. Practical implications: The higher risk of child physical maltreatment associated with IPV highlights the need for an integrated assessment to screen for the presence of multiple forms of family violence within the family, and for intervention to assess effective responses to both IPV and child maltreatment by child protective service workers and domestic violence agencies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chiabunegen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChild Abuse and Neglecten_HK
dc.subjectChild maltreatmenten_HK
dc.subjectCo-occurrenceen_HK
dc.subjectCorporal punishmenten_HK
dc.subjectIntimate partner violenceen_HK
dc.titleChildren exposed to child maltreatment and intimate partner violence: A study of co-occurrence among Hong Kong Chinese familiesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0145-2134&volume=35&issue=7&spage=532&epage=542&date=2011&atitle=Children+exposed+to+child+maltreatment+and+intimate+partner+violence:+a+study+of+co-occurrence+among+Hong+Kong+Chinese+families-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KL: eklchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KL=rp00572en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chiabu.2011.03.008en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21816472-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80051815256en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185727en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80051815256&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage532en_HK
dc.identifier.epage542en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7757-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295185100008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KL=8504873300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9775534-

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