File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The dilemma of being a police auxiliary: an Australian case study of police liaison officers

TitleThe dilemma of being a police auxiliary: an Australian case study of police liaison officers
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://policing.oxfordjournals.org
Citation
Policing (Oxford): a journal of policy and practice, 2011, v. 5 n. 2, p. 180-187 How to Cite?
AbstractPublic police agencies have aimed to improve their community liaison role through the establishment of police auxiliaries. These ‘quasi’ police positions form part of a broader police reform agenda focused on engaging racially and ethnically diverse communities. One example of this trend in Australia has been the emergence of Police Liaison Officers (PLOs). This article draws on research into a PLO programme in the Australian state of Queensland in order to explore the problems and dilemmas that can beset liaison officer programmes. It highlights the conflicts and problems that can arise from ambiguities inherent in the PLO role. These can be particularly pronounced for police auxiliaries who are of an ethnic/racial background. Implications for police policy and practice are identified.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134456
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.253

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCherney, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChui, WHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:21:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:21:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPolicing (Oxford): a journal of policy and practice, 2011, v. 5 n. 2, p. 180-187en_US
dc.identifier.issn1752-4512en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134456-
dc.description.abstractPublic police agencies have aimed to improve their community liaison role through the establishment of police auxiliaries. These ‘quasi’ police positions form part of a broader police reform agenda focused on engaging racially and ethnically diverse communities. One example of this trend in Australia has been the emergence of Police Liaison Officers (PLOs). This article draws on research into a PLO programme in the Australian state of Queensland in order to explore the problems and dilemmas that can beset liaison officer programmes. It highlights the conflicts and problems that can arise from ambiguities inherent in the PLO role. These can be particularly pronounced for police auxiliaries who are of an ethnic/racial background. Implications for police policy and practice are identified.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://policing.oxfordjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPolicing (Oxford): a journal of policy and practiceen_US
dc.titleThe dilemma of being a police auxiliary: an Australian case study of police liaison officersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1752-4512&volume=5&issue=2&spage=180&epage=187&date=2011&atitle=The+dilemma+of+being+a+police+auxiliary:+an+Australian+case+study+of+police+liaison+officersen_US
dc.identifier.emailChui, WH: ericchui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChui, WH=rp00854en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/police/par028-
dc.identifier.hkuros185495en_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage180en_US
dc.identifier.epage187en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats