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Article: Discriminatory zoning in colonial Hong Kong: A review of the post-war literature and some further evidence for an economic theory of discrimination

TitleDiscriminatory zoning in colonial Hong Kong: A review of the post-war literature and some further evidence for an economic theory of discrimination
Authors
KeywordsPrices
Racial discrimination
Telephone
Issue Date2011
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/pm/pm.jsp
Citation
Property Management, 2011, v. 29 n. 1, p. 50-86 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This paper seeks to argue that racially discriminatory zoning in Colonial Hong Kong could have been a form of protectionism driven by economic considerations. Design/methodology/approach: This paper was based on a review of the relevant ordinances, literature, and public information, notably data obtained from the Land Registry and telephone directories. Findings: This paper reveals that many writings on racial matters in Hong Kong were not a correct interpretation or presentation of facts. It shows that after the repeal of the discriminatory laws in 1946, an increasing number of people, both Chinese and European, were living in the Peak district. Besides, Chinese were found to be acquiring land even under the discriminatory law for Barker Road during the mid-1920s and became, after 1946, the majority landlords by the mid-1970s. This testifies to the argument that the Chinese could compete economically with Europeans for prime residential premises in Hong Kong. Research limitations/implications: This paper lends further support to the Lawrence-Marco proposition raised in Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design by Lai and Yu, which regards segregation zoning as a means to reduce the effective demand of an economically resourceful social group. Practical implications: This paper shows how title documents for land and telephone directories can be used to measure the degree of racial segregation. Originality/value: This paper is the first attempt to systematically re-interpret English literature on racially discriminatory zoning in Hong Kong's Peak area using reliable public information from Crown Leases and telephone directories. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134452
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.331
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, LWCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:21:08Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:21:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProperty Management, 2011, v. 29 n. 1, p. 50-86en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0263-7472en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134452-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper seeks to argue that racially discriminatory zoning in Colonial Hong Kong could have been a form of protectionism driven by economic considerations. Design/methodology/approach: This paper was based on a review of the relevant ordinances, literature, and public information, notably data obtained from the Land Registry and telephone directories. Findings: This paper reveals that many writings on racial matters in Hong Kong were not a correct interpretation or presentation of facts. It shows that after the repeal of the discriminatory laws in 1946, an increasing number of people, both Chinese and European, were living in the Peak district. Besides, Chinese were found to be acquiring land even under the discriminatory law for Barker Road during the mid-1920s and became, after 1946, the majority landlords by the mid-1970s. This testifies to the argument that the Chinese could compete economically with Europeans for prime residential premises in Hong Kong. Research limitations/implications: This paper lends further support to the Lawrence-Marco proposition raised in Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design by Lai and Yu, which regards segregation zoning as a means to reduce the effective demand of an economically resourceful social group. Practical implications: This paper shows how title documents for land and telephone directories can be used to measure the degree of racial segregation. Originality/value: This paper is the first attempt to systematically re-interpret English literature on racially discriminatory zoning in Hong Kong's Peak area using reliable public information from Crown Leases and telephone directories. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/pm/pm.jspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProperty Managementen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPricesen_HK
dc.subjectRacial discriminationen_HK
dc.subjectTelephoneen_HK
dc.titleDiscriminatory zoning in colonial Hong Kong: A review of the post-war literature and some further evidence for an economic theory of discriminationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0263-7472&volume=29&issue=1&spage=50&epage=86&date=2011&atitle=Discriminatory+zoning+in+colonial+Hong+Kong:+a+review+of+the+post-war+literature+and+some+further+evidence+for+an+economic+theory+of+discrimination-
dc.identifier.emailLai, LWC:wclai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, LWC=rp01004en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/02637471111102932en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79551716447en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185714en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79551716447&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage50en_HK
dc.identifier.epage86en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, LWC=7202616218en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8797051-

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