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Article: Influence of various implant platform configurations on peri-implant tissue dimensions: An experimental study in dog

TitleInfluence of various implant platform configurations on peri-implant tissue dimensions: An experimental study in dog
Authors
KeywordsAnimal study
Bone healing
Bone levels
Histometry
Oral implants
Platform design
Soft tissue dimensions
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2011, v. 22 n. 4, p. 438-444 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: To evaluate the influence (i) of various implant platform configurations and (ii) of implant surface characteristics on peri-implant tissue dimensions in a dog model. Material and methods: Mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally in six Labrador dogs. After 3 months of healing, two implants, one with a turned and a second with a moderately rough surface, were installed on each side of the mandible in the premolar region. On the right side of the mandible, implants with a tapered and enlarged platform were used, while standard cylindrical implants were installed in the left side of the mandible. Abutments with the diameter of the cylindrical implants were used resulting in a mismatch of 0.25mm at the tapered implant sites. The flaps were sutured to allow a non-submerged healing. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections were obtained for histometric assessment. Results: All implants were completely osseointegrated. A minimal buccal bone resorption was observed for both implant configurations and surface topographies. Considering the animals as the statistical unit, no significant differences were found at the buccal aspect in relation to bone levels and soft tissue dimensions. The surface topographies did not influence the outcomes either. Conclusions: The present study failed to show differences in peri-implant tissue dimensions when a mismatch of 0.25mm from a tapered platform to an abutment was applied. The surface topographies influence a neither marginal bone resorption or peri-implant soft tissue dimension. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134341
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.889
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.290
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Sweden & Martina SRL, Due Carrare, Padova, Italia
ARDEC, Ariminum Odontologica SRL, Rimini, Italia
Funding Information:

This study has been supported by a grant from Sweden & Martina SRL, Due Carrare, Padova, Italia and by ARDEC, Ariminum Odontologica SRL, Rimini, Italia. The competent contributions of Professor Luiz Antonio Salata and Mr. Sebastiao Bianco (USP - Faculty of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto - University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil) in the histological processing are highly appreciated. The authors declare no conflict of interest.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBaffone, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBotticelli, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorPantani, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCardoso, LCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchweikert, MTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:18:04Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:18:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2011, v. 22 n. 4, p. 438-444en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134341-
dc.description.abstractAim: To evaluate the influence (i) of various implant platform configurations and (ii) of implant surface characteristics on peri-implant tissue dimensions in a dog model. Material and methods: Mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally in six Labrador dogs. After 3 months of healing, two implants, one with a turned and a second with a moderately rough surface, were installed on each side of the mandible in the premolar region. On the right side of the mandible, implants with a tapered and enlarged platform were used, while standard cylindrical implants were installed in the left side of the mandible. Abutments with the diameter of the cylindrical implants were used resulting in a mismatch of 0.25mm at the tapered implant sites. The flaps were sutured to allow a non-submerged healing. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections were obtained for histometric assessment. Results: All implants were completely osseointegrated. A minimal buccal bone resorption was observed for both implant configurations and surface topographies. Considering the animals as the statistical unit, no significant differences were found at the buccal aspect in relation to bone levels and soft tissue dimensions. The surface topographies did not influence the outcomes either. Conclusions: The present study failed to show differences in peri-implant tissue dimensions when a mismatch of 0.25mm from a tapered platform to an abutment was applied. The surface topographies influence a neither marginal bone resorption or peri-implant soft tissue dimension. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectAnimal studyen_HK
dc.subjectBone healingen_HK
dc.subjectBone levelsen_HK
dc.subjectHistometryen_HK
dc.subjectOral implantsen_HK
dc.subjectPlatform designen_HK
dc.subjectSoft tissue dimensionsen_HK
dc.titleInfluence of various implant platform configurations on peri-implant tissue dimensions: An experimental study in dogen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0905-7161&volume=22&issue=4&spage=438&epage=444&date=2004&atitle=Influence+of+various+implant+platform+configurations+on+peri-implant+tissue+dimensions:+an+experimental+study+in+dog-
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.02146.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21561485en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952527343en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185688en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79952527343&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage438en_HK
dc.identifier.epage444en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288214300012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaffone, GM=35975598700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBotticelli, D=6601962395en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPantani, F=37008599600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCardoso, LC=51161088400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchweikert, MT=55194072000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8993403-

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