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Article: The role of bone debris in early healing adjacent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic implant surfaces in man

TitleThe role of bone debris in early healing adjacent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic implant surfaces in man
Authors
KeywordsBone debris
Dental implants
Human
Osseointegration
SLA ®
SLActive ®
Surface characteristics
Wound healing
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2011, v. 22 n. 4, p. 357-364 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate morphologically and morphometrically the sequential healing and osseointegration events at moderately rough implant surfaces with and without chemical modification. Particularly the role of bone debris in initiating bone formation was emphasized. Material and methods: Solid, screw-type cylindrical titanium implants (SSI) (n=49), 4mm long and 2.8mm wide, with either chemically modified (SLActive ®) or sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA ®) surface configurations were surgically installed in the retromolar region of 28 human volunteers. After 7, 14, 28 and 42 days of submerged healing, the devices were retrieved with a trephine. Histologic ground sections were prepared and histomorphometrically analyzed. Linear measurements determined fractions of old bone (OBIC), new bone (NBIC), soft tissue (ST) and bone debris (BD) in contact with the SSI surfaces. Results: Healing was uneventful at all installation sites. Sixty-one percent of all devices were suitable for morphometric analyses. All implant surfaces were partially coated with bone debris and new bone formation was observed as early as 7 days after installation. There was a gradual increase in NBIC, whereas OBIC, ST and BD progressively decreased over time. NBIC after 2 and 4 weeks was higher on SLActive ® than on SLA ® surfaces, albeit statistically not significant. The BD:ST ratio changed significantly from 7 to 42 days (from 50:50 to 10:90 for SLActive ®; from 38:62 to 10:90 for SLA ®) (Fisher's exact test, P<0.01). Conclusion: Both SLActive ® and SLA ® devices became progressively osseointegrated, while old bone on the device surface was gradually resorbed. The decrease in BD:ST ratio suggests that bone debris, created during implant installation and adhering to moderately rough surfaces, significantly contributed to the initiation of bone deposition and mediated the connection between the old bone and the new bone on the implant surface. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134337
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.889
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.290
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
ITI Foundation (ITI, Basel Switzerland)371/04
Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz, SwitzerlandCRF 022/07
Funding Information:

The authors are indebted to Mr D. Reist, Mrs M. Aeberhard and Mrs S. Owusu for excellent technical assistance in the laboratory, to Mr W. Burgin for performing the statistical analysis. The organizational help of the clinical team of the former Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics of the University of Berne is duely acknowledged. Last, but not least, a great acknowledgement belongs to the volunteer students and employees of the University of Berne School of Dental Medicine for having participated in the study. This study was supported by a grant (371/04) from the ITI Foundation (ITI, Basel Switzerland) and by the Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz, Switzerland (CRF 022/07).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBosshardt, DDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSalvi, GEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuynhBa, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIvanovski, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDonos, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:18:02Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:18:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2011, v. 22 n. 4, p. 357-364en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134337-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate morphologically and morphometrically the sequential healing and osseointegration events at moderately rough implant surfaces with and without chemical modification. Particularly the role of bone debris in initiating bone formation was emphasized. Material and methods: Solid, screw-type cylindrical titanium implants (SSI) (n=49), 4mm long and 2.8mm wide, with either chemically modified (SLActive ®) or sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA ®) surface configurations were surgically installed in the retromolar region of 28 human volunteers. After 7, 14, 28 and 42 days of submerged healing, the devices were retrieved with a trephine. Histologic ground sections were prepared and histomorphometrically analyzed. Linear measurements determined fractions of old bone (OBIC), new bone (NBIC), soft tissue (ST) and bone debris (BD) in contact with the SSI surfaces. Results: Healing was uneventful at all installation sites. Sixty-one percent of all devices were suitable for morphometric analyses. All implant surfaces were partially coated with bone debris and new bone formation was observed as early as 7 days after installation. There was a gradual increase in NBIC, whereas OBIC, ST and BD progressively decreased over time. NBIC after 2 and 4 weeks was higher on SLActive ® than on SLA ® surfaces, albeit statistically not significant. The BD:ST ratio changed significantly from 7 to 42 days (from 50:50 to 10:90 for SLActive ®; from 38:62 to 10:90 for SLA ®) (Fisher's exact test, P<0.01). Conclusion: Both SLActive ® and SLA ® devices became progressively osseointegrated, while old bone on the device surface was gradually resorbed. The decrease in BD:ST ratio suggests that bone debris, created during implant installation and adhering to moderately rough surfaces, significantly contributed to the initiation of bone deposition and mediated the connection between the old bone and the new bone on the implant surface. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectBone debrisen_HK
dc.subjectDental implantsen_HK
dc.subjectHumanen_HK
dc.subjectOsseointegrationen_HK
dc.subjectSLA ®en_HK
dc.subjectSLActive ®en_HK
dc.subjectSurface characteristicsen_HK
dc.subjectWound healingen_HK
dc.titleThe role of bone debris in early healing adjacent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic implant surfaces in manen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0905-7161&volume=22&issue=4&spage=357&epage=364&date=2011&atitle=The+role+of+bone+debris+in+early+healing+adjacent+to+hydrophilic+and+hydrophobic+implant+surfaces+in+man-
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.02107.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21561477-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952495179en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185681en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79952495179&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage357en_HK
dc.identifier.epage364en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288214300002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBosshardt, DD=6603806230en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalvi, GE=35600695300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuynhBa, G=25825004200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIvanovski, S=6601979085en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDonos, N=7004314492en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8993413-

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