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Article: Is optimal vision required for the successful execution of an interceptive task?

TitleIs optimal vision required for the successful execution of an interceptive task?
Authors
KeywordsContact lenses
Cricket
Myopia
Sports
Visual acuity
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humov
Citation
Human Movement Science, 2007, v. 26 n. 3, p. 343-356 How to Cite?
AbstractThe importance of optimal visual function in demanding interceptive tasks is far from established. The aim of the study was to determine whether induced myopic blur and hence sub-optimal visual function would give rise to a detrimental effect on performance in the execution of an interceptive task. The batting performance of grade level cricket players was assessed facing a bowling machine whilst wearing contact lenses of four different refractive conditions (plano (nil), +1.00, +2.00 and +3.00 D over-refraction), inducing increasing amounts of myopic blur. Performance for each condition was assessed based both on the shot quality against each delivery judged by a qualified cricket coach blind to each condition, along with an evaluation of the quality of ball-bat contact for each delivery. No significant change was found in batting performance with the introduction of +1.00 and +2.00 D of induced myopic blur. A +3.00 D over-correction was required before any significant decrease in batting performance was detected, demonstrating that batters needed to be essentially legally blind (as simulated through the use of the +3.00 D over-refraction) before there was any significant measurable decrement in batting performance. We concluded that optimal visual correction is not necessarily required for optimal performance in a demanding interceptive task, and that the human perceptual-motor system is capable of compensating for marked alterations in input. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134244
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.593
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMann, DLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, NYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Souza, NJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWatson, DRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, SJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:21:12Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:21:12Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Movement Science, 2007, v. 26 n. 3, p. 343-356en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0167-9457en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134244-
dc.description.abstractThe importance of optimal visual function in demanding interceptive tasks is far from established. The aim of the study was to determine whether induced myopic blur and hence sub-optimal visual function would give rise to a detrimental effect on performance in the execution of an interceptive task. The batting performance of grade level cricket players was assessed facing a bowling machine whilst wearing contact lenses of four different refractive conditions (plano (nil), +1.00, +2.00 and +3.00 D over-refraction), inducing increasing amounts of myopic blur. Performance for each condition was assessed based both on the shot quality against each delivery judged by a qualified cricket coach blind to each condition, along with an evaluation of the quality of ball-bat contact for each delivery. No significant change was found in batting performance with the introduction of +1.00 and +2.00 D of induced myopic blur. A +3.00 D over-correction was required before any significant decrease in batting performance was detected, demonstrating that batters needed to be essentially legally blind (as simulated through the use of the +3.00 D over-refraction) before there was any significant measurable decrement in batting performance. We concluded that optimal visual correction is not necessarily required for optimal performance in a demanding interceptive task, and that the human perceptual-motor system is capable of compensating for marked alterations in input. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humoven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Movement Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectContact lensesen_HK
dc.subjectCricketen_HK
dc.subjectMyopiaen_HK
dc.subjectSportsen_HK
dc.subjectVisual acuityen_HK
dc.titleIs optimal vision required for the successful execution of an interceptive task?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMann, DL: dmann@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMann, DL=rp01492en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.humov.2006.12.003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17289195-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250854577en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250854577&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage343en_HK
dc.identifier.epage356en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248585900001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMann, DL=24464168800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, NY=16646086300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Souza, NJ=16645250400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatson, DR=16647864900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, SJ=55462788200en_HK

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