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Article: An event-related visual occlusion method for examining anticipatory skill in natural interceptive tasks

TitleAn event-related visual occlusion method for examining anticipatory skill in natural interceptive tasks
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPsychonomic Society, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychonomic.org/BRMIC/
Citation
Behavior Research Methods, 2010, v. 42 n. 2, p. 556-562 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article describes a new automated method for the controlled occlusion of vision during natural tasks. The method permits the time course of the presence or absence of visual information to be linked to identifiable events within the task of interest. An example application is presented in which the method is used to examine the ability of cricket batsmen to pick up useful information from the prerelease movement patterns of the opposing bowler. Two key events, separated by a consistent within-action time lag, were identified in the cricket bowling action sequence-namely, the penultimate foot strike prior to ball release (Event 1), and the subsequent moment of ball release (Event 2). Force-plate registration of Event 1 was then used as a trigger to facilitate automated occlusion of vision using liquid crystal occlusion goggles at time points relative to Event 2. Validation demonstrated that, compared with existing approaches that are based on manual triggering, this method of occlusion permitted considerable gains in temporal precision and a reduction in the number of unusable trials. A more efficient and accurate protocol to examine anticipation is produced, while preserving the important natural coupling between perception and action. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134241
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.928
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMann, DLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpratford, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:21:11Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:21:11Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBehavior Research Methods, 2010, v. 42 n. 2, p. 556-562en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1554-351Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134241-
dc.description.abstractThis article describes a new automated method for the controlled occlusion of vision during natural tasks. The method permits the time course of the presence or absence of visual information to be linked to identifiable events within the task of interest. An example application is presented in which the method is used to examine the ability of cricket batsmen to pick up useful information from the prerelease movement patterns of the opposing bowler. Two key events, separated by a consistent within-action time lag, were identified in the cricket bowling action sequence-namely, the penultimate foot strike prior to ball release (Event 1), and the subsequent moment of ball release (Event 2). Force-plate registration of Event 1 was then used as a trigger to facilitate automated occlusion of vision using liquid crystal occlusion goggles at time points relative to Event 2. Validation demonstrated that, compared with existing approaches that are based on manual triggering, this method of occlusion permitted considerable gains in temporal precision and a reduction in the number of unusable trials. A more efficient and accurate protocol to examine anticipation is produced, while preserving the important natural coupling between perception and action. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPsychonomic Society, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychonomic.org/BRMIC/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBehavior Research Methodsen_HK
dc.titleAn event-related visual occlusion method for examining anticipatory skill in natural interceptive tasksen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMann, DL: dmann@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, B: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMann, DL=rp01492en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, B=rp00886en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/BRM.42.2.556en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955896424en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182608-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955896424&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage556en_HK
dc.identifier.epage562en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285920000021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMann, DL=24464168800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbernethy, B=8841578500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFarrow, D=7006613807en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavis, M=7404851267en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpratford, W=26325774500en_HK

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