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Article: The resilience of natural interceptive actions to refractive blur
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TitleThe resilience of natural interceptive actions to refractive blur
 
AuthorsMann, DL4 3
Abernethy, B2 1
Farrow, D3
 
KeywordsContact lenses
Cricket
Myopia
Sport
Visual acuity
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humov
 
CitationHuman Movement Science, 2010, v. 29 n. 3, p. 386-400 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2010.02.007
 
AbstractThe impact of refractive visual blur on interceptive skill was examined for a series of highly-demanding striking tasks. Ten skilled cricket batsmen were required to intercept balls projected by either a ball projection-machine (medium-pace only) or cricket bowlers (two velocities; medium-pace and fast-pace) under each of four systematically varied visual conditions. Contact lenses were fitted to simulate increments in refractive blur (habitual, +1.00, +2.00, +3.00. D), with changes in interceptive performance evaluated on three concurrent measures of performance relevant to cricket batting (quality of bat-ball contact, forcefulness of bat-swing, and likelihood of dismissal). For the projection-machine condition, results replicate those reported previously (Mann, Ho, De Souza, Watson, & Taylor, 2007) with blur needing to reach +3.00. D before any significant decreases in performance were evident, a finding further replicated when facing bowlers of comparable velocity. The influence of blur on interception was found to interact with ball-velocity, with the increased temporal demands of fast-paced trials resulting in decreased performance becoming evident at a lower level of blur (+2.00. D). The findings demonstrate that even when presented with a situation replicating highly-demanding performance conditions, substantial degradation of visual clarity is possible before acuity is a limiting factor for interceptive performance. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
 
ISSN0167-9457
2012 Impact Factor: 2.064
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.646
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2010.02.007
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000278508100004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Cricket Australia Sport Science Sport Medicine Research Program
Funding Information:

This project was funded by a research grant from the Cricket Australia Sport Science Sport Medicine Research Program. The authors would like to thank staff of the Skill Acquisition, and the Biomechanics and Performance Analysis disciplines at the Australian Institute of Sport for their assistance in data collection, in particular Melissa Hopwood, Lyndell Bruce, Megan Rendell, Ina Janssen, and Adam Gorman. Cricket ACT, in particular Ashley Ross and Andrew Dawson, assisted with participant recruitment and provided the bowling-machine.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMann, DL
 
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, B
 
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:21:09Z
 
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:21:09Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe impact of refractive visual blur on interceptive skill was examined for a series of highly-demanding striking tasks. Ten skilled cricket batsmen were required to intercept balls projected by either a ball projection-machine (medium-pace only) or cricket bowlers (two velocities; medium-pace and fast-pace) under each of four systematically varied visual conditions. Contact lenses were fitted to simulate increments in refractive blur (habitual, +1.00, +2.00, +3.00. D), with changes in interceptive performance evaluated on three concurrent measures of performance relevant to cricket batting (quality of bat-ball contact, forcefulness of bat-swing, and likelihood of dismissal). For the projection-machine condition, results replicate those reported previously (Mann, Ho, De Souza, Watson, & Taylor, 2007) with blur needing to reach +3.00. D before any significant decreases in performance were evident, a finding further replicated when facing bowlers of comparable velocity. The influence of blur on interception was found to interact with ball-velocity, with the increased temporal demands of fast-paced trials resulting in decreased performance becoming evident at a lower level of blur (+2.00. D). The findings demonstrate that even when presented with a situation replicating highly-demanding performance conditions, substantial degradation of visual clarity is possible before acuity is a limiting factor for interceptive performance. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHuman Movement Science, 2010, v. 29 n. 3, p. 386-400 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2010.02.007
 
dc.identifier.citeulike7108677
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2010.02.007
 
dc.identifier.epage400
 
dc.identifier.hkuros182603
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278508100004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Cricket Australia Sport Science Sport Medicine Research Program
Funding Information:

This project was funded by a research grant from the Cricket Australia Sport Science Sport Medicine Research Program. The authors would like to thank staff of the Skill Acquisition, and the Biomechanics and Performance Analysis disciplines at the Australian Institute of Sport for their assistance in data collection, in particular Melissa Hopwood, Lyndell Bruce, Megan Rendell, Ina Janssen, and Adam Gorman. Cricket ACT, in particular Ashley Ross and Andrew Dawson, assisted with participant recruitment and provided the bowling-machine.

 
dc.identifier.issn0167-9457
2012 Impact Factor: 2.064
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.646
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid20430464
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952889859
 
dc.identifier.spage386
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134240
 
dc.identifier.volume29
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humov
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Movement Science
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectContact lenses
 
dc.subjectCricket
 
dc.subjectMyopia
 
dc.subjectSport
 
dc.subjectVisual acuity
 
dc.titleThe resilience of natural interceptive actions to refractive blur
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Queensland
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Australian Institute of Sport
  4. University of New South Wales