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Article: Visual information underpinning skilled anticipation: The effect of blur on a coupled and uncoupled in situ anticipatory response
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TitleVisual information underpinning skilled anticipation: The effect of blur on a coupled and uncoupled in situ anticipatory response
 
AuthorsMann, DL3 4
Abernethy, B2 1
Farrow, D3
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherPsychonomic Society, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychonomic.org/PP/
 
CitationAttention, Perception, And Psychophysics, 2010, v. 72 n. 5, p. 1317-1326 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/APP.72.5.1317
 
AbstractCoupled interceptive actions are understood to be the result of neural processing-and visual information-which is distinct from that used for uncoupled perceptual responses. To examine the visual information used for action and perception, skilled cricket batters anticipated the direction of balls bowled toward them using a coupled movement (an interceptive action that preserved the natural coupling between perception and action) or an uncoupled (verbal) response, in each of four different visual blur conditions (plano, +1.00, +2.00, +3.00). Coupled responses were found to be better than uncoupled ones, with the blurring of vision found to result in different effects for the coupled and uncoupled response conditions. Low levels of visual blur did not affect coupled anticipation, a finding consistent with the comparatively poorer visual information on which online interceptive actions are proposed to rely. In contrast, some evidence was found to suggest that low levels of blur may enhance the uncoupled verbal perception of movement. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.
 
ISSN1943-3921
2012 Impact Factor: 1.969
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.256
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3758/APP.72.5.1317
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000282067200013
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Cricket Australia
Funding Information:

This project was funded by a research grant from the Cricket Australia Sport Science Sport Medicine Research Program. The authors thank staff of the Skill Acquisition and Biomechanics and Performance Analysis disciplines at the Australian Institute of Sport for their assistance in data collection, in particular Melissa Hopwood, Lyndell Bruce, Megan Rendell, Ina Janssen, and Adam Gorman. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to D. L. Mann, School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia (e-mail: d.mann@unsw.edu.au).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMann, DL
 
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, B
 
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:21:08Z
 
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:21:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractCoupled interceptive actions are understood to be the result of neural processing-and visual information-which is distinct from that used for uncoupled perceptual responses. To examine the visual information used for action and perception, skilled cricket batters anticipated the direction of balls bowled toward them using a coupled movement (an interceptive action that preserved the natural coupling between perception and action) or an uncoupled (verbal) response, in each of four different visual blur conditions (plano, +1.00, +2.00, +3.00). Coupled responses were found to be better than uncoupled ones, with the blurring of vision found to result in different effects for the coupled and uncoupled response conditions. Low levels of visual blur did not affect coupled anticipation, a finding consistent with the comparatively poorer visual information on which online interceptive actions are proposed to rely. In contrast, some evidence was found to suggest that low levels of blur may enhance the uncoupled verbal perception of movement. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAttention, Perception, And Psychophysics, 2010, v. 72 n. 5, p. 1317-1326 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/APP.72.5.1317
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3758/APP.72.5.1317
 
dc.identifier.epage1326
 
dc.identifier.hkuros182605
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282067200013
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Cricket Australia
Funding Information:

This project was funded by a research grant from the Cricket Australia Sport Science Sport Medicine Research Program. The authors thank staff of the Skill Acquisition and Biomechanics and Performance Analysis disciplines at the Australian Institute of Sport for their assistance in data collection, in particular Melissa Hopwood, Lyndell Bruce, Megan Rendell, Ina Janssen, and Adam Gorman. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to D. L. Mann, School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia (e-mail: d.mann@unsw.edu.au).

 
dc.identifier.issn1943-3921
2012 Impact Factor: 1.969
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.256
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid20601713
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957664380
 
dc.identifier.spage1317
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134239
 
dc.identifier.volume72
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPsychonomic Society, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychonomic.org/PP/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleVisual information underpinning skilled anticipation: The effect of blur on a coupled and uncoupled in situ anticipatory response
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Queensland
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Australian Institute of Sport
  4. University of New South Wales