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Article: Action specificity increases anticipatory performance and the expert advantage in natural interceptive tasks

TitleAction specificity increases anticipatory performance and the expert advantage in natural interceptive tasks
Authors
KeywordsCricket
Expertise
Perception
Perceptual-motor
Vision-for-action
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/actpsy
Citation
Acta Psychologica, 2010, v. 135 n. 1, p. 17-23 How to Cite?
AbstractThe relationship between perception-action coupling and anticipatory skill in an interceptive task was examined using an in-situ temporal occlusion paradigm. Skilled and novice cricket batsmen were required to predict the direction of balls bowled towards them under four counterbalanced response conditions of increasing perception-action coupling: (i) verbal, (ii) lower-body movement only, (iii) full-body movement (no bat), and (iv) full-body movement with bat (i.e., the usual batting response). Skilled but not novice anticipation was found to improve as a function of coupling when responses were based on either no ball-flight, or early ball-flight information, with a response requiring even the lowest degree of body movement found to enhance anticipation when compared to a verbal prediction. Most importantly, a full-body movement using a bat elicited greater anticipation than an equivalent movement with no bat. This result highlights the important role that the requirement and/or opportunity to make bat-ball interception may play in eliciting skill differences for anticipation. Results verify the importance of using experimental conditions and task demands that closely reflect the natural performance environment in order to reveal the full nature of the expert advantage. © 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134238
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.248
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.669
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMann, DLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:21:07Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Psychologica, 2010, v. 135 n. 1, p. 17-23en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0001-6918en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134238-
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between perception-action coupling and anticipatory skill in an interceptive task was examined using an in-situ temporal occlusion paradigm. Skilled and novice cricket batsmen were required to predict the direction of balls bowled towards them under four counterbalanced response conditions of increasing perception-action coupling: (i) verbal, (ii) lower-body movement only, (iii) full-body movement (no bat), and (iv) full-body movement with bat (i.e., the usual batting response). Skilled but not novice anticipation was found to improve as a function of coupling when responses were based on either no ball-flight, or early ball-flight information, with a response requiring even the lowest degree of body movement found to enhance anticipation when compared to a verbal prediction. Most importantly, a full-body movement using a bat elicited greater anticipation than an equivalent movement with no bat. This result highlights the important role that the requirement and/or opportunity to make bat-ball interception may play in eliciting skill differences for anticipation. Results verify the importance of using experimental conditions and task demands that closely reflect the natural performance environment in order to reveal the full nature of the expert advantage. © 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/actpsyen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Psychologicaen_HK
dc.subjectCricketen_HK
dc.subjectExpertiseen_HK
dc.subjectPerceptionen_HK
dc.subjectPerceptual-motoren_HK
dc.subjectVision-for-actionen_HK
dc.titleAction specificity increases anticipatory performance and the expert advantage in natural interceptive tasksen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMann, DL: dmann@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, B: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMann, DL=rp01492en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, B=rp00886en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.actpsy.2010.04.006en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20507831en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954386127en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182607-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954386127&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume135en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage17en_HK
dc.identifier.epage23en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280541000003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMann, DL=24464168800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbernethy, B=8841578500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFarrow, D=7006613807en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7264077-

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