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Article: Estimation of the duration of vaccine-induced residual protection against severe and fatal smallpox based on secondary vaccination failure

TitleEstimation of the duration of vaccine-induced residual protection against severe and fatal smallpox based on secondary vaccination failure
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2006
PublisherUrban und Vogel Medien und Medizin Verlagsgesellschaft mbH. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.urban-vogel.de/programm/infection/index.de.rsePage
Citation
Infection, 2006, v. 34 n. 5, p. 241-246 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Understanding the Loss of vaccine-induced immunity against smallpox is essential in determining the fraction of those who are still protected in the present population and in constructing effective countermeasures against bioterrorist attacks. Method: Three small Australian outbreaks from the 1880s to early 1900s were investigated. Each documented individual age at infection. The case records for Launceston, 1903, further documented the age at vaccination and disease severity, enabling estimates of the duration of protection against severe and fatal smallpox. Results: A significant association between vaccination and death was observed in the outbreak in Sydney, 1881 (odds ratio of death among vaccinated individuals = 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1, 0.8; p = 0.02), where the time since last vaccination was similar for all vaccinated cases. In Launceston, 1903, where the age at vaccination varied widely, the median duration of partial protection against severe and fatal smallpox was estimated to be 31.7 (95% CI: 13.2, 116.2) and 53.9 (95% CI: 25.6, 123.5) years after vaccination, respectively. Whereas those in their 20s are expected to have the highest frequency of vulnerability to smallpox death in the present population, infections among those in their 30s or 40s are expected to be much less fatal. Conclusion: Long lasting partial protection was suggested from the outbreak records, the estimated durations of which were roughly consistent with those reported previously. In the event of a bioterrorist attack, those involved in emergency tasks before emergency vaccination practices are re-established should ideally be previously vaccinated individuals in their 30s or 40s. © Urban & Vogel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134233
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.294
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.994
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEichner, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:57Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInfection, 2006, v. 34 n. 5, p. 241-246en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-8126en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134233-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Understanding the Loss of vaccine-induced immunity against smallpox is essential in determining the fraction of those who are still protected in the present population and in constructing effective countermeasures against bioterrorist attacks. Method: Three small Australian outbreaks from the 1880s to early 1900s were investigated. Each documented individual age at infection. The case records for Launceston, 1903, further documented the age at vaccination and disease severity, enabling estimates of the duration of protection against severe and fatal smallpox. Results: A significant association between vaccination and death was observed in the outbreak in Sydney, 1881 (odds ratio of death among vaccinated individuals = 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1, 0.8; p = 0.02), where the time since last vaccination was similar for all vaccinated cases. In Launceston, 1903, where the age at vaccination varied widely, the median duration of partial protection against severe and fatal smallpox was estimated to be 31.7 (95% CI: 13.2, 116.2) and 53.9 (95% CI: 25.6, 123.5) years after vaccination, respectively. Whereas those in their 20s are expected to have the highest frequency of vulnerability to smallpox death in the present population, infections among those in their 30s or 40s are expected to be much less fatal. Conclusion: Long lasting partial protection was suggested from the outbreak records, the estimated durations of which were roughly consistent with those reported previously. In the event of a bioterrorist attack, those involved in emergency tasks before emergency vaccination practices are re-established should ideally be previously vaccinated individuals in their 30s or 40s. © Urban & Vogel.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUrban und Vogel Medien und Medizin Verlagsgesellschaft mbH. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.urban-vogel.de/programm/infection/index.de.rsePageen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInfectionen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBioterrorismen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshJapanen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmallpox - epidemiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmallpox Vaccine - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshVaccinationen_HK
dc.titleEstimation of the duration of vaccine-induced residual protection against severe and fatal smallpox based on secondary vaccination failureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s15010-006-6603-5en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17033746-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749865208en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33749865208&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage241en_HK
dc.identifier.epage246en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241601300002-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEichner, M=26643365500en_HK

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