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Article: Household and community transmission of the Asian influenza A (H2N2) and influenza B viruses in 1957 and 1961

TitleHousehold and community transmission of the Asian influenza A (H2N2) and influenza B viruses in 1957 and 1961
Authors
KeywordsReferences (31) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2007
PublisherSoutheast Asian Ministers of Education Organisation (SEAMEO), Regional Tropical Medicine & Public Health Project (TROPMED). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/en/seameo/publication.htm
Citation
Southeast Asian Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Public Health, 2007, v. 38 n. 6, p. 1075-1083 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study analyzed the distribution of the number of cases in households of various sizes, reconsidering previous survey data from the Asian influenza A (H2N2) pandemic in 1957 and the influenza B epidemic in 1961. The final size distributions for the number of household cases were extracted from four different data sources (n = 547, 671, 92 and 263 households), and a probability model was applied to estimate the community probability of infection (CPI) and household secondary attack rate (SAR). For the 1957 Asian influenza pandemic, the CPI and household SAR were estimated to be 0.42 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.37, 0.47] and 7.06% (95% CI: 4.73, 9.44), respectively, using data from Tokyo. The figures for the same pandemic using data from Osaka were 0.21 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.22) and 9.07% (95% CI: 6.73, 11.53), respectively. Similarly, the CPI and household SAR for two different datasets of influenza B epidemics in Osaka in 1961 were estimated as 0.37 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.44) and 18.41% (95% CI: 11.37, 25.95) and 0.20 (95% CI: 0.13, 0.28) and 10.51% (95% CI: 8.01, 13.15), respectively. Community transmission was more frequent than household transmission, both for the Asian influenza pandemic and the influenza B epidemic, implying that community-based countermeasures (eg, area quarantine and social distancing) may play key roles in influenza interventions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134220
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.773
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.423
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChowell, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:54Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:54Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSoutheast Asian Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Public Health, 2007, v. 38 n. 6, p. 1075-1083en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0125-1562en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134220-
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzed the distribution of the number of cases in households of various sizes, reconsidering previous survey data from the Asian influenza A (H2N2) pandemic in 1957 and the influenza B epidemic in 1961. The final size distributions for the number of household cases were extracted from four different data sources (n = 547, 671, 92 and 263 households), and a probability model was applied to estimate the community probability of infection (CPI) and household secondary attack rate (SAR). For the 1957 Asian influenza pandemic, the CPI and household SAR were estimated to be 0.42 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.37, 0.47] and 7.06% (95% CI: 4.73, 9.44), respectively, using data from Tokyo. The figures for the same pandemic using data from Osaka were 0.21 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.22) and 9.07% (95% CI: 6.73, 11.53), respectively. Similarly, the CPI and household SAR for two different datasets of influenza B epidemics in Osaka in 1961 were estimated as 0.37 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.44) and 18.41% (95% CI: 11.37, 25.95) and 0.20 (95% CI: 0.13, 0.28) and 10.51% (95% CI: 8.01, 13.15), respectively. Community transmission was more frequent than household transmission, both for the Asian influenza pandemic and the influenza B epidemic, implying that community-based countermeasures (eg, area quarantine and social distancing) may play key roles in influenza interventions.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSoutheast Asian Ministers of Education Organisation (SEAMEO), Regional Tropical Medicine & Public Health Project (TROPMED). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/en/seameo/publication.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSoutheast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Healthen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (31) View In Table Layouten_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - historyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHistory, 20th Centuryen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H2N2 Subtypeen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza B virusen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - history - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshJapan - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristicsen_HK
dc.titleHousehold and community transmission of the Asian influenza A (H2N2) and influenza B viruses in 1957 and 1961en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid18613549-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37849023088en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37849023088&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1075en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1083en_HK
dc.publisher.placeThailanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChowell, G=9845935500en_HK

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