File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Transmission dynamics of Hepatitis E among swine: Potential impact upon human infection

TitleTransmission dynamics of Hepatitis E among swine: Potential impact upon human infection
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2007
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcvetres
Citation
Bmc Veterinary Research, 2007, v. 3 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a zoonosis for which pigs play a role as a reservoir. In Japan, the infection has been enzootic in swine. Clarifying the detailed mechanisms of transmission within farms is required in order to facilitate an understanding of the age-specific patterns of infection, especially just prior to slaughter. Results: Here we reanalyze a large-scale seroprevalence survey dataset from Japanese pig farms to estimate the force of infection. The forces of infection of swine HEV were estimated to be 3.45 (95% confidence interval:3.17, 3.75), 2.68 (2.28, 3.14) and 3.11 (2.76, 3.50) [×10-2 per day] in Hokkaido, Honshu and Kyushu, respectively. The estimates with our model assumptions indicated that the average ages at infection ranged from 59.0-67.3 days and that the basic reproduction number, R0, was in the order of 4.02-5.17. Sensitivity analyses of age-specific incidence at different forces of infection revealed that a decline in the force of infection would elevate the age at infection and could increase the number of virus-excreting pigs at the age of 180 days. Conclusion: Although our estimates imply that more than 95% of pigs are infected before the age of 150 days, the model shows that a decline in the force of infection could increase the risk of pigto-human transmission. If the force of infection started to decline, it might be necessary to implement radical countermeasures (e.g. separation of uninfected pigs from infected herds beginning from the end of the suckling stage) to minimize the number of virus-positive pigs at the finishing stage. © 2007 Satou and Nishiura; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134219
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.643
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.952
PubMed Central ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSatou, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:53Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Veterinary Research, 2007, v. 3en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1746-6148en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134219-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a zoonosis for which pigs play a role as a reservoir. In Japan, the infection has been enzootic in swine. Clarifying the detailed mechanisms of transmission within farms is required in order to facilitate an understanding of the age-specific patterns of infection, especially just prior to slaughter. Results: Here we reanalyze a large-scale seroprevalence survey dataset from Japanese pig farms to estimate the force of infection. The forces of infection of swine HEV were estimated to be 3.45 (95% confidence interval:3.17, 3.75), 2.68 (2.28, 3.14) and 3.11 (2.76, 3.50) [×10-2 per day] in Hokkaido, Honshu and Kyushu, respectively. The estimates with our model assumptions indicated that the average ages at infection ranged from 59.0-67.3 days and that the basic reproduction number, R0, was in the order of 4.02-5.17. Sensitivity analyses of age-specific incidence at different forces of infection revealed that a decline in the force of infection would elevate the age at infection and could increase the number of virus-excreting pigs at the age of 180 days. Conclusion: Although our estimates imply that more than 95% of pigs are infected before the age of 150 days, the model shows that a decline in the force of infection could increase the risk of pigto-human transmission. If the force of infection started to decline, it might be necessary to implement radical countermeasures (e.g. separation of uninfected pigs from infected herds beginning from the end of the suckling stage) to minimize the number of virus-positive pigs at the finishing stage. © 2007 Satou and Nishiura; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcvetresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Veterinary Researchen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_US
dc.titleTransmission dynamics of Hepatitis E among swine: Potential impact upon human infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1746-6148-3-9en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17493260en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1885244-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250667451en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250667451&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSatou, K=36794024500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1290712-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats