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Article: An epidemiological analysis of severe cases of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Japan

TitleAn epidemiological analysis of severe cases of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Japan
Authors
KeywordsReferences (23) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1
Citation
Influenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2010, v. 4 n. 4, p. 179-186 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The age distribution of confirmed cases with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 has shifted toward children and young adults, in contrast to interpandemic influenza, because of the age specificities in immunological reactions and transmission characteristics. Objectives: Descriptive epidemiological analysis of severe cases in Japan was carried out to characterize the pandemic's impact and clinical features. Methods: First, demographic characteristics of hospitalized cases (n = 12 923), severe cases (n = 894) and fatal cases (n = 116) were examined. Second, individual records of the first 120 severe cases, including 23 deaths, were analyzed to examine potential associations of influenza death with demographic variables, medical treatment and underlying conditions. Among severe cases, we compared proportions of specific characteristics of survivors with those of fatal cases to identify predictors of death. Results: Age distribution of hospitalized cases shifted toward those aged <20 years; this was also the case for deaths without underlying medical conditions. Deaths in adults were mainly seen among those with underlying medical conditions, resulting in an increased risk of death as a function of age. According to individual records, the time from onset to death in Japan appeared rather short compared with that in other countries. Conclusion: The age specificity of severe cases and their underlying medical conditions were consistent with other countries. To identify predictors of death in influenza A (H1N1) 2009 patients, more detailed clinical characteristics need to be examined according to different age groups and types of manifestations, which should ideally include mild cases as subjects. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134195
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.378
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.570
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan
JST
Funding Information:

KW and AK received Health and Labour Sciences Research Grants from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan in 2009. The work of HN was supported by JST PRESTO program.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWada, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKawana, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:46Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:46Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInfluenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2010, v. 4 n. 4, p. 179-186en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-2640en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134195-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The age distribution of confirmed cases with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 has shifted toward children and young adults, in contrast to interpandemic influenza, because of the age specificities in immunological reactions and transmission characteristics. Objectives: Descriptive epidemiological analysis of severe cases in Japan was carried out to characterize the pandemic's impact and clinical features. Methods: First, demographic characteristics of hospitalized cases (n = 12 923), severe cases (n = 894) and fatal cases (n = 116) were examined. Second, individual records of the first 120 severe cases, including 23 deaths, were analyzed to examine potential associations of influenza death with demographic variables, medical treatment and underlying conditions. Among severe cases, we compared proportions of specific characteristics of survivors with those of fatal cases to identify predictors of death. Results: Age distribution of hospitalized cases shifted toward those aged <20 years; this was also the case for deaths without underlying medical conditions. Deaths in adults were mainly seen among those with underlying medical conditions, resulting in an increased risk of death as a function of age. According to individual records, the time from onset to death in Japan appeared rather short compared with that in other countries. Conclusion: The age specificity of severe cases and their underlying medical conditions were consistent with other countries. To identify predictors of death in influenza A (H1N1) 2009 patients, more detailed clinical characteristics need to be examined according to different age groups and types of manifestations, which should ideally include mild cases as subjects. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInfluenza and other Respiratory Virusesen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (23) View In Table Layouten_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshJapanen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPandemicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_HK
dc.titleAn epidemiological analysis of severe cases of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Japanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-2659.2010.00143.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20836793-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954488955en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954488955&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage179en_HK
dc.identifier.epage186en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1750-2659-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279739800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWada, K=36015715400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKawana, A=7005029345en_HK

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