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Article: Surveillance of wild birds for avian influenza virus

TitleSurveillance of wild birds for avian influenza virus
Authors
KeywordsReferences (38) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2010
PublisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm
Citation
Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2010, v. 16 n. 12, p. 1827-1834 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent demand for increased understanding of avian influenza virus in its natural hosts, together with the development of high-throughput diagnostics, has heralded a new era in wildlife disease surveillance. However, survey design, sampling, and interpretation in the context of host populations still present major challenges. We critically reviewed current surveillance to distill a series of considerations pertinent to avian influenza virus surveillance in wild birds, including consideration of what, when, where, and how many to sample in the context of survey objectives. Recognizing that wildlife disease surveillance is logistically and financially constrained, we discuss pragmatic alternatives for achieving probability-based sampling schemes that capture this host-pathogen system. We recommend hypothesis-driven surveillance through standardized, local surveys that are, in turn, strategically compiled over broad geographic areas. Rethinking the use of existing surveillance infrastructure can thereby greatly enhance our global understanding of avian influenza and other zoonotic diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134187
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.994
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.023
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research851 40 073
851 40 074
European Union044490
Japan Science and Technology Precursory Re search for Embryonic Science and Technology
National Institutes of HealthNIAIDNIH HHSN266200700010C
Funding Information:

This study was supported through the Bird Health programme within the International Polar Year by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (grant nos 851 40 073 and 851 40 074), European Union Framework six program NewFlu Bird (044490) Japan Science and Technology Precursory Re search for Embryonic Science and Technology program and the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, contract NIAIDNIH HHSN266200700010C This is publication 4876 of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHoye, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMunster, VJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKlaassen, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorFouchier, RAMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:44Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:44Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Infectious Diseases, 2010, v. 16 n. 12, p. 1827-1834en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134187-
dc.description.abstractRecent demand for increased understanding of avian influenza virus in its natural hosts, together with the development of high-throughput diagnostics, has heralded a new era in wildlife disease surveillance. However, survey design, sampling, and interpretation in the context of host populations still present major challenges. We critically reviewed current surveillance to distill a series of considerations pertinent to avian influenza virus surveillance in wild birds, including consideration of what, when, where, and how many to sample in the context of survey objectives. Recognizing that wildlife disease surveillance is logistically and financially constrained, we discuss pragmatic alternatives for achieving probability-based sampling schemes that capture this host-pathogen system. We recommend hypothesis-driven surveillance through standardized, local surveys that are, in turn, strategically compiled over broad geographic areas. Rethinking the use of existing surveillance infrastructure can thereby greatly enhance our global understanding of avian influenza and other zoonotic diseases.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (38) View In Table Layouten_US
dc.titleSurveillance of wild birds for avian influenza virusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3201/eid1612.100589en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21122209-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3294547-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649531428en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649531428&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1827en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1834en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1080-6059-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285031100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoye, BJ=26632061000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMunster, VJ=9332531900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlaassen, M=7004383496en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFouchier, RAM=7006060466en_HK

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