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Article: Dementia-specific risks of scabies: Retrospective epidemiologic analysis of an unveiled nosocomial outbreak in Japan from 1989-90

TitleDementia-specific risks of scabies: Retrospective epidemiologic analysis of an unveiled nosocomial outbreak in Japan from 1989-90
Authors
KeywordsAdult
Aged
Analytic Method
Body Movement
Clinical Observation
Clinical Practice
Cognitive Defect
Confidence Interval
Controlled Study
Daily Life Activity
Disease Duration
Epidemic
Female
Hospital Bed
Hospital Infection
Hospital Patient
Human
Infection Control
Interpersonal Communication
Japan
Major Clinical Study
Male
Medical Documentation
Medical Record
Patient Attitude
Prediction
Publication
Retrospective Study
Review
Risk Assessment
Risk Factor
Scabies
Senile Dementia
Sleep
Statistical Analysis
Statistical Significance
Ward
Issue Date2005
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/
Citation
Bmc Infectious Diseases, 2005, v. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Although senile dementia patients in long-term care facilities are at leading risk of scabies, the epidemiologic characteristics of this disease have yet to be fully clarified. This study documents the findings of a ward-scale nosocomial outbreak in western Japan from 1989-90, for which permission to publish was only recently obtained. Methods: A retrospective epidemiologic study was performed to identify specific risk factors of scabies among patients with dementia. Analyses were based on a review of medical and nursing records. All inpatients in the affected ward at the time of the outbreak were included in the study. Observational and analytical approaches were employed to assess the findings. Results: Twenty of 65 inpatients in the ward met the case definition of scabies. The outbreak. lasted for almost 10 months and as a result, the spatial distribution of infections showed no localized patterns in the latter phase of the outbreak. The duration of illness significantly decreased after initiation of control measures (P = 0.0067). Movement without assistance (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.3; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 2.9,44.8) and moving beyond the room (but within the ward) (OR=4.1; 95% CI: 1.4, 12.5) were significantly associated with infection, while types of room (Western or Japanese) and sleeping arrangement (on beds or futons laid directly on the floor) appeared not to be risk factors. Conclusion: Univariate analysis demonstrated the importance of patients' behaviours during daily activities in controlling scabies among senile dementia patients. The findings also support previous evidence that catching scabies from fomites is far less common. Moreover, since cognitive disorders make it difficult for individuals to communicate and understand the implications of risky contacts as well as treatment method, and given the non-specific nature of individual contacts that are often unpredictable, real-time observations might help improve control practices. © 2005 Tsutsumi et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134166
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.510
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsutsumi, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKobayashi, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:36Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Infectious Diseases, 2005, v. 5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134166-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although senile dementia patients in long-term care facilities are at leading risk of scabies, the epidemiologic characteristics of this disease have yet to be fully clarified. This study documents the findings of a ward-scale nosocomial outbreak in western Japan from 1989-90, for which permission to publish was only recently obtained. Methods: A retrospective epidemiologic study was performed to identify specific risk factors of scabies among patients with dementia. Analyses were based on a review of medical and nursing records. All inpatients in the affected ward at the time of the outbreak were included in the study. Observational and analytical approaches were employed to assess the findings. Results: Twenty of 65 inpatients in the ward met the case definition of scabies. The outbreak. lasted for almost 10 months and as a result, the spatial distribution of infections showed no localized patterns in the latter phase of the outbreak. The duration of illness significantly decreased after initiation of control measures (P = 0.0067). Movement without assistance (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.3; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 2.9,44.8) and moving beyond the room (but within the ward) (OR=4.1; 95% CI: 1.4, 12.5) were significantly associated with infection, while types of room (Western or Japanese) and sleeping arrangement (on beds or futons laid directly on the floor) appeared not to be risk factors. Conclusion: Univariate analysis demonstrated the importance of patients' behaviours during daily activities in controlling scabies among senile dementia patients. The findings also support previous evidence that catching scabies from fomites is far less common. Moreover, since cognitive disorders make it difficult for individuals to communicate and understand the implications of risky contacts as well as treatment method, and given the non-specific nature of individual contacts that are often unpredictable, real-time observations might help improve control practices. © 2005 Tsutsumi et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectAnalytic Methoden_US
dc.subjectBody Movementen_US
dc.subjectClinical Observationen_US
dc.subjectClinical Practiceen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Defecten_US
dc.subjectConfidence Intervalen_US
dc.subjectControlled Studyen_US
dc.subjectDaily Life Activityen_US
dc.subjectDisease Durationen_US
dc.subjectEpidemicen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHospital Beden_US
dc.subjectHospital Infectionen_US
dc.subjectHospital Patienten_US
dc.subjectHumanen_US
dc.subjectInfection Controlen_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal Communicationen_US
dc.subjectJapanen_US
dc.subjectMajor Clinical Studyen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMedical Documentationen_US
dc.subjectMedical Recorden_US
dc.subjectPatient Attitudeen_US
dc.subjectPredictionen_US
dc.subjectPublicationen_US
dc.subjectRetrospective Studyen_US
dc.subjectReviewen_US
dc.subjectRisk Assessmenten_US
dc.subjectRisk Factoren_US
dc.subjectScabiesen_US
dc.subjectSenile Dementiaen_US
dc.subjectSleepen_US
dc.subjectStatistical Analysisen_US
dc.subjectStatistical Significanceen_US
dc.subjectWarden_US
dc.titleDementia-specific risks of scabies: Retrospective epidemiologic analysis of an unveiled nosocomial outbreak in Japan from 1989-90en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-5-85en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16225694-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1276794-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27844487978en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27844487978&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232982300002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsutsumi, M=15728918700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKobayashi, T=7408541287en_HK

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