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Article: Analysis of a previous smallpox vaccination study: Estimation of the time period required to acquire vaccine-induced immunity as assessed by revaccination

TitleAnalysis of a previous smallpox vaccination study: Estimation of the time period required to acquire vaccine-induced immunity as assessed by revaccination
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2006
PublisherSoutheast Asian Ministers of Education Organisation (SEAMEO), Regional Tropical Medicine & Public Health Project (TROPMED). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/en/seameo/publication.htm
Citation
Southeast Asian Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Public Health, 2006, v. 37 n. 4, p. 673-680 How to Cite?
AbstractThe time interval required to develop immunity after vaccination, in the event of a bioterrorist attack using variola virus, is yet to be clarified. In this article, a historical vaccination study conducted in Japan in 1929 was re-examined. Forty-four previously vaccinated and 44 unvaccinated children were involved. After successful first round primary (or re-) vaccination, all children underwent revaccination at variable intervals. Absence of a major reaction (vaccine 'take') after revaccination was taken as a sign of immunity conferred by first round primary (or re-) vaccination. Univariate analysis was employed to examine the relationship between vaccine 'take' and the exposure variables. Maximum likelihood estimates of the time period required to develop immunity were obtained using a simple logit model. The interval between vaccinations was significantly associated with vaccine 'take' in both the previously unvaccinated (p < 0.01) and vaccinated (p < 0.01) groups, and the median interval required for immunity after vaccination was estimated to be 6.4 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 5.8, 7.1] and 4.3 days (95% CI: 4.1, 4.7), respectively. Obtained estimates were consistent with previous observations, and the logistic fits reasonably explained the discrepancy among previous suggestions. The findings suggest that it is necessary to vaccinate exposed susceptible individuals within 3 days after exposure to ensure disease protection, and within at least 5 days (for those previously unvaccinated) to provide a certain level of protection; the probability shows a dramatic decline hereafter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134165
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.773
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.423
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-13T07:20:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-13T07:20:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSoutheast Asian Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Public Health, 2006, v. 37 n. 4, p. 673-680en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0125-1562en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134165-
dc.description.abstractThe time interval required to develop immunity after vaccination, in the event of a bioterrorist attack using variola virus, is yet to be clarified. In this article, a historical vaccination study conducted in Japan in 1929 was re-examined. Forty-four previously vaccinated and 44 unvaccinated children were involved. After successful first round primary (or re-) vaccination, all children underwent revaccination at variable intervals. Absence of a major reaction (vaccine 'take') after revaccination was taken as a sign of immunity conferred by first round primary (or re-) vaccination. Univariate analysis was employed to examine the relationship between vaccine 'take' and the exposure variables. Maximum likelihood estimates of the time period required to develop immunity were obtained using a simple logit model. The interval between vaccinations was significantly associated with vaccine 'take' in both the previously unvaccinated (p < 0.01) and vaccinated (p < 0.01) groups, and the median interval required for immunity after vaccination was estimated to be 6.4 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 5.8, 7.1] and 4.3 days (95% CI: 4.1, 4.7), respectively. Obtained estimates were consistent with previous observations, and the logistic fits reasonably explained the discrepancy among previous suggestions. The findings suggest that it is necessary to vaccinate exposed susceptible individuals within 3 days after exposure to ensure disease protection, and within at least 5 days (for those previously unvaccinated) to provide a certain level of protection; the probability shows a dramatic decline hereafter.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSoutheast Asian Ministers of Education Organisation (SEAMEO), Regional Tropical Medicine & Public Health Project (TROPMED). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/en/seameo/publication.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSoutheast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Healthen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshJapanen_HK
dc.subject.meshLikelihood Functionsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMass Vaccination - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmallpox - immunology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmallpox Vaccine - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_HK
dc.titleAnalysis of a previous smallpox vaccination study: Estimation of the time period required to acquire vaccine-induced immunity as assessed by revaccinationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid17121292-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33750219012en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33750219012&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage673en_HK
dc.identifier.epage680en_HK
dc.publisher.placeThailanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK

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