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Conference Paper: Breathing space: ecology and sovereignty in Pacific Island poetry

TitleBreathing space: ecology and sovereignty in Pacific Island poetry
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherFaculty of Arts and Law, The University of the South Pacific Laucala Campus.
Citation
The Oceanic Conference on Creativity and Climate Change: Oceans, Islands & Skies, Suva, Fiji, 13-17 September 2010. In Dreadlocks, 2012, v. 6/7, p. 147-173 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper will discuss the ways in which the image of breath serves to concretize ideas and attitudes toward ecology and sovereignty in Pacific Island poetry. It will be based on the recognition of the importance of the oceanic environment to the cultures and societies of the Island Pacific, of connectedness as a defining characteristic of island life, and of the irreplaceable value of islands as places. One implication of this recognition is that the pursuit of sovereignty and development is inseparable from respect for ecology and sustainability. Perceptions and interpretations of the ocean as a connecting element have often been framed in terms of fluidity and mobility suggested by a metaphorical association between the ocean and blood that encompasses genealogical histories of migration and settlement. In my paper, I will try to suggest the advantage of framing such perceptions and interpretations in terms of a metaphorical association between the ocean and breath, drawing attention to the connection between the oceans and the lifesustaining terrestrial Atmosphere as well as the existence of islands as habitable places threatened by rising sea levels. I will indicate the importance accorded to breath and breathing in indigenous epistemologies, emphasizing the value of centered relationships and an acknowledgment of the presence and precedence of others within and beyond the horizon of visibility, and discuss the metaphorical significance of breath in conceptualizations of space, the negotiation of boundaries and cross-cultural (institutional) action with reference to poems by Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard, Robert Sullivan, Teweiariki Teaero and Teresia Teaiwa.
DescriptionPaper Session XIII
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133749
ISBN
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeim, Oen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T02:17:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-24T02:17:58Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Oceanic Conference on Creativity and Climate Change: Oceans, Islands & Skies, Suva, Fiji, 13-17 September 2010. In Dreadlocks, 2012, v. 6/7, p. 147-173en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-927184-02-8-
dc.identifier.issn2225-5206-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133749-
dc.descriptionPaper Session XIII-
dc.description.abstractThis paper will discuss the ways in which the image of breath serves to concretize ideas and attitudes toward ecology and sovereignty in Pacific Island poetry. It will be based on the recognition of the importance of the oceanic environment to the cultures and societies of the Island Pacific, of connectedness as a defining characteristic of island life, and of the irreplaceable value of islands as places. One implication of this recognition is that the pursuit of sovereignty and development is inseparable from respect for ecology and sustainability. Perceptions and interpretations of the ocean as a connecting element have often been framed in terms of fluidity and mobility suggested by a metaphorical association between the ocean and blood that encompasses genealogical histories of migration and settlement. In my paper, I will try to suggest the advantage of framing such perceptions and interpretations in terms of a metaphorical association between the ocean and breath, drawing attention to the connection between the oceans and the lifesustaining terrestrial Atmosphere as well as the existence of islands as habitable places threatened by rising sea levels. I will indicate the importance accorded to breath and breathing in indigenous epistemologies, emphasizing the value of centered relationships and an acknowledgment of the presence and precedence of others within and beyond the horizon of visibility, and discuss the metaphorical significance of breath in conceptualizations of space, the negotiation of boundaries and cross-cultural (institutional) action with reference to poems by Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard, Robert Sullivan, Teweiariki Teaero and Teresia Teaiwa.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Arts and Law, The University of the South Pacific Laucala Campus.-
dc.relation.ispartofOceanic Conference on Creativity and Climate Changeen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleBreathing space: ecology and sovereignty in Pacific Island poetryen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHeim, O: oheim@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros185215en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros200566-
dc.description.otherThe Oceanic Conference on Creativity and Climate Change: Oceans, Islands & Skies, Suva, Fiji, 13-17 September 2010. In Dreadlocks, 2012, v. 6/7, p. 147-173-

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