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Article: The valence of attentional bias and cancer-related rumination in posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth among women with breast cancer

TitleThe valence of attentional bias and cancer-related rumination in posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth among women with breast cancer
Authors
KeywordsAttentional bias
Breast cancer
Oncology
Posttraumatic growth
Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2011, v. 20 n. 5, p. 544-552 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine the effects of self-reported attentional bias on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) through the potential mediator of cancer-related rumination. Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used and women with breast cancer (N = 170) were recruited. Measures: Attentional biases, cancer-related ruminations, PTSD symptoms, and PTG were assessed. Results: Negative attentional bias and negative cancer-related rumination were positively related to PTSD symptoms following cancer diagnosis and treatments, but they were not related to PTG. Positive attentional bias and positive cancer-related rumination were positively related to PTG, but positive attentional bias was not related to PTSD symptoms. Findings showed that negative cancer-related rumination partially mediated the relationship between negative attentional bias and PTSD symptoms, while positive cancer-related rumination partially mediated the relationship between positive attentional bias and PTG. Conclusion: Findings support that there are differential trajectories to PTSD symptoms and PTG with respect to different valence of habitual attentional style and cancer-related rumination. They may serve as potential therapeutic leverages in the alleviation of PTSD symptoms and facilitation of PTG following cancer diagnosis and treatments. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133680
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, MWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTedeschi, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CWLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T02:14:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-24T02:14:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2011, v. 20 n. 5, p. 544-552en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133680-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the effects of self-reported attentional bias on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) through the potential mediator of cancer-related rumination. Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used and women with breast cancer (N = 170) were recruited. Measures: Attentional biases, cancer-related ruminations, PTSD symptoms, and PTG were assessed. Results: Negative attentional bias and negative cancer-related rumination were positively related to PTSD symptoms following cancer diagnosis and treatments, but they were not related to PTG. Positive attentional bias and positive cancer-related rumination were positively related to PTG, but positive attentional bias was not related to PTSD symptoms. Findings showed that negative cancer-related rumination partially mediated the relationship between negative attentional bias and PTSD symptoms, while positive cancer-related rumination partially mediated the relationship between positive attentional bias and PTG. Conclusion: Findings support that there are differential trajectories to PTSD symptoms and PTG with respect to different valence of habitual attentional style and cancer-related rumination. They may serve as potential therapeutic leverages in the alleviation of PTSD symptoms and facilitation of PTG following cancer diagnosis and treatments. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectAttentional biasen_HK
dc.subjectBreast canceren_HK
dc.subjectOncologyen_HK
dc.subjectPosttraumatic growthen_HK
dc.subjectPosttraumatic stress disorder symptomsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAttention-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms - psychology-
dc.subject.meshCognition-
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology - psychology-
dc.titleThe valence of attentional bias and cancer-related rumination in posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth among women with breast canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SMY: munyin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SMY=rp00554en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1761en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20878854-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953747985en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185354en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953747985&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage544en_HK
dc.identifier.epage552en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289441300012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, MWC=7402597935en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SMY=25722730500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTedeschi, RG=7006593468en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CWL=35201229900en_HK

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