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Article: A comparative study of online suicide-related information in Chinese and English

TitleA comparative study of online suicide-related information in Chinese and English
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011, v. 72 n. 3, p. 313-319 How to Cite?
Abstract
Objective: This study analyzed the online suicide-related contents of Chinese-language Web sites compared with contents observed in an American study that considered English-language Web sites, so as to examine what differences there might be between Chinese online information and its English counterpart. Method: Online contents were generated by entering 4 suicide-related search queries into 5 popular search engines (Google China, Yahoo! China, Live search, Baidu, and Sogou) in mainland China in September 2008. The search queries were simplified Chinese translations of terms used in a 2008 American study that used similar methodology: Zi Sha (suicide), Ru He Zi Sha (how to commit suicide), Zen Yang Zi Sha (how to kill yourself), and Zi Sha Fang Fa (suicide method). Three coders from mainland China reviewed the first 3 pages of results from each search and rated their contents in terms of the attitude toward suicide reflected therein (prosuicide, anti-suicide, neutral, not a suicide site, or error [page would not load]). Other characteristics of the Web sites were analyzed. The results were then compared with those of the earlier study of English-language Web sites. Results: Of the Chinese Web sites, a smaller proportion carried pro-suicide information compared with the corresponding results obtained from the study of English-language Web sites (4.2% vs 11.7%), whereas the proportion of anti-suicide Web sites in both languages was almost the same (32.3% vs 34.9%). Anti-suicide Web sites in Chinese, however, provided less information on seeking help, and there were fewer government or professional mental health Web sites in Chinese (1.3% vs 13.3%). The pro-suicide information on Chinese Web sites was mostly found in personal blogs or online forums. Conclusion: Psychiatrists and public health researchers dealing with suicide prevention in China should be aware of the differences between online suicide-related information in the Chinese and English languages. © Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133678
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 5.139
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.258
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T02:14:33Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-24T02:14:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011, v. 72 n. 3, p. 313-319en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0160-6689en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133678-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study analyzed the online suicide-related contents of Chinese-language Web sites compared with contents observed in an American study that considered English-language Web sites, so as to examine what differences there might be between Chinese online information and its English counterpart. Method: Online contents were generated by entering 4 suicide-related search queries into 5 popular search engines (Google China, Yahoo! China, Live search, Baidu, and Sogou) in mainland China in September 2008. The search queries were simplified Chinese translations of terms used in a 2008 American study that used similar methodology: Zi Sha (suicide), Ru He Zi Sha (how to commit suicide), Zen Yang Zi Sha (how to kill yourself), and Zi Sha Fang Fa (suicide method). Three coders from mainland China reviewed the first 3 pages of results from each search and rated their contents in terms of the attitude toward suicide reflected therein (prosuicide, anti-suicide, neutral, not a suicide site, or error [page would not load]). Other characteristics of the Web sites were analyzed. The results were then compared with those of the earlier study of English-language Web sites. Results: Of the Chinese Web sites, a smaller proportion carried pro-suicide information compared with the corresponding results obtained from the study of English-language Web sites (4.2% vs 11.7%), whereas the proportion of anti-suicide Web sites in both languages was almost the same (32.3% vs 34.9%). Anti-suicide Web sites in Chinese, however, provided less information on seeking help, and there were fewer government or professional mental health Web sites in Chinese (1.3% vs 13.3%). The pro-suicide information on Chinese Web sites was mostly found in personal blogs or online forums. Conclusion: Psychiatrists and public health researchers dealing with suicide prevention in China should be aware of the differences between online suicide-related information in the Chinese and English languages. © Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Death-
dc.subject.meshChina-
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparison-
dc.subject.meshInternet - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshSuicide - psychology-
dc.titleA comparative study of online suicide-related information in Chinese and Englishen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0160-6689&volume=72&issue=3&spage=313&epage=319&date=2011&atitle=A+comparative+study+of+online+suicide-related+information+in+Chinese+and+English-
dc.identifier.emailFu, KW: kwfu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFu, KW=rp00552en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.4088/JCP.09m05440bluen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20868633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953043218en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185233en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953043218&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume72en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage313en_HK
dc.identifier.epage319en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288838100006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, Q=37053342400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, KW=16315896700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK

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