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Article: Narrative assessment for cantonese-speaking children

TitleNarrative assessment for cantonese-speaking children
Authors
KeywordsAssessment
Cantonese
Narrative
School-age children
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2010, v. 53 n. 3, p. 648-669 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: This study examined the narrative skills of Cantonese-speaking schoolage children to fill a need for a normative language test for school-age children. Purpose: To provide a benchmark of the narrative skills of Cantonese-speaking children; to identify which of the microstructure components was the best predictor of age; and to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the test components. Method and Procedure: Data were collected from 1, 120 Cantonese-speaking children between the ages of 4;10 (years;months) and 12;01, using a story-retell of a 24-frame picture series. Four narrative components (syntactic complexity, semantic score, referencing, and connective use) were measured. Outcomes and Results: Each measure reflected significant age-related differences in narrative ability. Regression analyses revealed that vocabulary and syntactic complexity were the best predictors of grade. All measures showed high sensitivity (86%-94%) but relatively low specificity (60%-90%) and modest likelihood ratio (LR) values: LR+ (2.15-9.42) and LR- (0.07-0.34). Conclusion and Implications: Narrative assessment can be standardized to be a reliable and valid instrument to assist in the identification of children with language impairment. Syntactic complexity is not only a strong predictor of grade but was also particularly vulnerable in Cantonese-speaking children with specific language impairment. Further diagnostic research using narrative analysis is warranted. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133541
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, CKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStokes, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, HTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorT'sou, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-18T09:14:06Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-18T09:14:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2010, v. 53 n. 3, p. 648-669en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133541-
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study examined the narrative skills of Cantonese-speaking schoolage children to fill a need for a normative language test for school-age children. Purpose: To provide a benchmark of the narrative skills of Cantonese-speaking children; to identify which of the microstructure components was the best predictor of age; and to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the test components. Method and Procedure: Data were collected from 1, 120 Cantonese-speaking children between the ages of 4;10 (years;months) and 12;01, using a story-retell of a 24-frame picture series. Four narrative components (syntactic complexity, semantic score, referencing, and connective use) were measured. Outcomes and Results: Each measure reflected significant age-related differences in narrative ability. Regression analyses revealed that vocabulary and syntactic complexity were the best predictors of grade. All measures showed high sensitivity (86%-94%) but relatively low specificity (60%-90%) and modest likelihood ratio (LR) values: LR+ (2.15-9.42) and LR- (0.07-0.34). Conclusion and Implications: Narrative assessment can be standardized to be a reliable and valid instrument to assist in the identification of children with language impairment. Syntactic complexity is not only a strong predictor of grade but was also particularly vulnerable in Cantonese-speaking children with specific language impairment. Further diagnostic research using narrative analysis is warranted. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAssessmenten_HK
dc.subjectCantoneseen_HK
dc.subjectNarrativeen_HK
dc.subjectSchool-age childrenen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Language-
dc.subject.meshLanguage Tests-
dc.subject.meshLinguistics-
dc.subject.meshNarration-
dc.subject.meshVocabulary-
dc.titleNarrative assessment for cantonese-speaking childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1092-4388&volume=53&issue=3&spage=648–669&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Narrative+assessment+for+Cantonese-speaking+children-
dc.identifier.emailTo, CKS: tokitsum@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTo, CKS=rp00962en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0039)en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20530380-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953327885en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros173505-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953327885&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage648en_HK
dc.identifier.epage669en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1558-9102-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278488000009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTo, CKS=36830030600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStokes, SF=7101743675en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, HT=7201839421en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridT'sou, B=6507762151en_HK

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