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Article: A brief cognitive-behavioral stress management program for secondary school teachers
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TitleA brief cognitive-behavioral stress management program for secondary school teachers
 
AuthorsLeung, SSK1
Chiang, VCL3
Chui, YY2
Mak, YW3
Wong, DFK2
 
KeywordsCognitive behavior therapy
Intervention studies
Occupational health
Psychological
School teachers
Stress
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherNihon Sangyo Eisei Gakkai. The Journal's web site is located at http://joh.med.uoeh-u.ac.jp
 
CitationJournal Of Occupational Health, 2011, v. 53 n. 1, p. 23-35 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1539/joh.L10037
 
AbstractObjective: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a brief cognitivebehavioral program that was designed to reduce the work-related stress levels of secondary school teachers. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the intervention groups with the wait-list control groups. Seventy teachers from the intervention groups and 54 from the control groups completed a set of validated scales at the baseline and 3-4 wk later. The scales included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-Form A, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Occupational Stress Inventory Revised Edition. Results: After controlling for the baseline measures, the intervention groups had significantly lower role stress, personal strain and overall work-related stress 3-4 wk after the baseline measurements. The intervention groups also had significantly higher stress management behaviors, and less general stress and dysfunctional thoughts than the control groups (all p≤0.05). The levels of dysfunctional thoughts and stress management behaviors significantly predicted general stress after intervention and personal resource deficits. The level of dysfunctional thoughts also predicted the personal strain of work-related stresses (all p<0.05). Conclusions: The brief program reported in this study was efficacious in reducing the work-related stress of secondary teachers. Teachers experienced less work-related stress after the program, and they reported reduced dysfunctional thoughts and enhanced stress management behaviors. This program may be considered as an initial strategy for teachers to develop skills to cope with their work-related stress in the short term and could be incorporated with other strategies to achieve longer-term effects.
 
ISSN1341-9145
2013 Impact Factor: 1.096
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.421
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1539/joh.L10037
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000286912200004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Seed Funding for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was funded by Seed Funding for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong. The team would like to acknowledge Dr. Ora Kwo (Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong), whose agreement to let us participate in a continuous teacher training and development program inspired our initial conception of this study. We also thank the teachers who participated in the study.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSK
 
dc.contributor.authorChiang, VCL
 
dc.contributor.authorChui, YY
 
dc.contributor.authorMak, YW
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFK
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T09:52:39Z
 
dc.date.available2011-05-17T09:52:39Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a brief cognitivebehavioral program that was designed to reduce the work-related stress levels of secondary school teachers. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the intervention groups with the wait-list control groups. Seventy teachers from the intervention groups and 54 from the control groups completed a set of validated scales at the baseline and 3-4 wk later. The scales included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-Form A, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Occupational Stress Inventory Revised Edition. Results: After controlling for the baseline measures, the intervention groups had significantly lower role stress, personal strain and overall work-related stress 3-4 wk after the baseline measurements. The intervention groups also had significantly higher stress management behaviors, and less general stress and dysfunctional thoughts than the control groups (all p≤0.05). The levels of dysfunctional thoughts and stress management behaviors significantly predicted general stress after intervention and personal resource deficits. The level of dysfunctional thoughts also predicted the personal strain of work-related stresses (all p<0.05). Conclusions: The brief program reported in this study was efficacious in reducing the work-related stress of secondary teachers. Teachers experienced less work-related stress after the program, and they reported reduced dysfunctional thoughts and enhanced stress management behaviors. This program may be considered as an initial strategy for teachers to develop skills to cope with their work-related stress in the short term and could be incorporated with other strategies to achieve longer-term effects.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Occupational Health, 2011, v. 53 n. 1, p. 23-35 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1539/joh.L10037
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1539/joh.L10037
 
dc.identifier.epage35
 
dc.identifier.hkuros187109
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286912200004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Seed Funding for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was funded by Seed Funding for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong. The team would like to acknowledge Dr. Ora Kwo (Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong), whose agreement to let us participate in a continuous teacher training and development program inspired our initial conception of this study. We also thank the teachers who participated in the study.

 
dc.identifier.issn1341-9145
2013 Impact Factor: 1.096
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.421
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21079374
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951830653
 
dc.identifier.spage23
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133510
 
dc.identifier.volume53
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNihon Sangyo Eisei Gakkai. The Journal's web site is located at http://joh.med.uoeh-u.ac.jp
 
dc.publisher.placeJapan
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Occupational Health
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCognitive behavior therapy
 
dc.subjectIntervention studies
 
dc.subjectOccupational health
 
dc.subjectPsychological
 
dc.subjectSchool teachers
 
dc.subjectStress
 
dc.titleA brief cognitive-behavioral stress management program for secondary school teachers
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. City University of Hong Kong
  3. Hong Kong Polytechnic University