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Article: A brief cognitive-behavioral stress management program for secondary school teachers

TitleA brief cognitive-behavioral stress management program for secondary school teachers
Authors
KeywordsCognitive behavior therapy
Intervention studies
Occupational health
Psychological
School teachers
Stress
Issue Date2011
PublisherNihon Sangyo Eisei Gakkai. The Journal's web site is located at http://joh.med.uoeh-u.ac.jp
Citation
Journal Of Occupational Health, 2011, v. 53 n. 1, p. 23-35 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a brief cognitivebehavioral program that was designed to reduce the work-related stress levels of secondary school teachers. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the intervention groups with the wait-list control groups. Seventy teachers from the intervention groups and 54 from the control groups completed a set of validated scales at the baseline and 3-4 wk later. The scales included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-Form A, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Occupational Stress Inventory Revised Edition. Results: After controlling for the baseline measures, the intervention groups had significantly lower role stress, personal strain and overall work-related stress 3-4 wk after the baseline measurements. The intervention groups also had significantly higher stress management behaviors, and less general stress and dysfunctional thoughts than the control groups (all p≤0.05). The levels of dysfunctional thoughts and stress management behaviors significantly predicted general stress after intervention and personal resource deficits. The level of dysfunctional thoughts also predicted the personal strain of work-related stresses (all p<0.05). Conclusions: The brief program reported in this study was efficacious in reducing the work-related stress of secondary teachers. Teachers experienced less work-related stress after the program, and they reported reduced dysfunctional thoughts and enhanced stress management behaviors. This program may be considered as an initial strategy for teachers to develop skills to cope with their work-related stress in the short term and could be incorporated with other strategies to achieve longer-term effects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133510
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.446
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.546
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Seed Funding for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was funded by Seed Funding for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong. The team would like to acknowledge Dr. Ora Kwo (Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong), whose agreement to let us participate in a continuous teacher training and development program inspired our initial conception of this study. We also thank the teachers who participated in the study.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiang, VCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChui, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, YWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T09:52:39Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-17T09:52:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Occupational Health, 2011, v. 53 n. 1, p. 23-35en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1341-9145en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133510-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a brief cognitivebehavioral program that was designed to reduce the work-related stress levels of secondary school teachers. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the intervention groups with the wait-list control groups. Seventy teachers from the intervention groups and 54 from the control groups completed a set of validated scales at the baseline and 3-4 wk later. The scales included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-Form A, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Occupational Stress Inventory Revised Edition. Results: After controlling for the baseline measures, the intervention groups had significantly lower role stress, personal strain and overall work-related stress 3-4 wk after the baseline measurements. The intervention groups also had significantly higher stress management behaviors, and less general stress and dysfunctional thoughts than the control groups (all p≤0.05). The levels of dysfunctional thoughts and stress management behaviors significantly predicted general stress after intervention and personal resource deficits. The level of dysfunctional thoughts also predicted the personal strain of work-related stresses (all p<0.05). Conclusions: The brief program reported in this study was efficacious in reducing the work-related stress of secondary teachers. Teachers experienced less work-related stress after the program, and they reported reduced dysfunctional thoughts and enhanced stress management behaviors. This program may be considered as an initial strategy for teachers to develop skills to cope with their work-related stress in the short term and could be incorporated with other strategies to achieve longer-term effects.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNihon Sangyo Eisei Gakkai. The Journal's web site is located at http://joh.med.uoeh-u.ac.jpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Occupational Healthen_HK
dc.subjectCognitive behavior therapyen_HK
dc.subjectIntervention studiesen_HK
dc.subjectOccupational healthen_HK
dc.subjectPsychologicalen_HK
dc.subjectSchool teachersen_HK
dc.subjectStressen_HK
dc.titleA brief cognitive-behavioral stress management program for secondary school teachersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1341-9145&volume=53&issue=1&spage=23&epage=35&date=2011&atitle=A+brief+cognitive-behavioral+stress+management+program+for+secondary+school+teachers-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, SSK: sleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiang, VCL: vchiang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMak, YW: makyw@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, SSK=rp00493en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiang, VCL=rp00520en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMak, YW=rp00525en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1539/joh.L10037en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21079374-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951830653en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187109-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951830653&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage23en_HK
dc.identifier.epage35en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286912200004-
dc.publisher.placeJapanen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSK=7202044879en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiang, VCL=25632099300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChui, YY=21740882200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, YW=36970189900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_HK

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