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Article: Bacterial colonization affects the intestinal proteome of preterm pigs susceptible to necrotizing enterocolitis

TitleBacterial colonization affects the intestinal proteome of preterm pigs susceptible to necrotizing enterocolitis
Authors
KeywordsGerm free
Microbial colonization
Necrotizing enterocolitis
Proteomics
Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis
Issue Date2011
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/BON
Citation
Neonatology, 2011, v. 99 n. 4, p. 280-288 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In newborns, colonizing bacteria and enteral nutrition are important for early gut development and immunity. However, in preterm newborns, bacterial colonization, coupled with enteral feeding, can lead to marked intestinal inflammation and disease such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesized that the initial bacterial colonization of the gut affects the intestinal proteome independently of enteral feeding. Objective: To identify the intestinal proteins affected by the first colonizing bacteria by comparing the intestinal proteome in formula-fed preterm pigs reared under germ free (GF) or conventional conditions. Methods: Gel-based proteomics of the small intestine to detect proteins that may play a part in the response of the immature intestine to bacterial colonization after birth. Results: Fourteen proteins involved in stress response and detoxification (e.g. heat-shock proteins, peroxiredoxin 1), tissue metabolism and apoptosis (e.g. annexin 2), and some signal transduction pathways were differentially expressed between GF and conventionally reared pigs. Conclusion: The premature intestine is highly responsive to initial bacterial colonization and the specific bacteria-related proteome changes may contribute to the stress response that makes the immature intestine sensitive to the pro-inflammatory effects of enteral feeding. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133414
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.754
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.442
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Danish Research Councils
Funding Information:

Research financially supported by the University of Hong Kong and Danish Research Councils.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSangild, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSiggers, RHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSit, WHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, JMFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-11T08:35:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-11T08:35:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeonatology, 2011, v. 99 n. 4, p. 280-288en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1661-7800en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133414-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In newborns, colonizing bacteria and enteral nutrition are important for early gut development and immunity. However, in preterm newborns, bacterial colonization, coupled with enteral feeding, can lead to marked intestinal inflammation and disease such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesized that the initial bacterial colonization of the gut affects the intestinal proteome independently of enteral feeding. Objective: To identify the intestinal proteins affected by the first colonizing bacteria by comparing the intestinal proteome in formula-fed preterm pigs reared under germ free (GF) or conventional conditions. Methods: Gel-based proteomics of the small intestine to detect proteins that may play a part in the response of the immature intestine to bacterial colonization after birth. Results: Fourteen proteins involved in stress response and detoxification (e.g. heat-shock proteins, peroxiredoxin 1), tissue metabolism and apoptosis (e.g. annexin 2), and some signal transduction pathways were differentially expressed between GF and conventionally reared pigs. Conclusion: The premature intestine is highly responsive to initial bacterial colonization and the specific bacteria-related proteome changes may contribute to the stress response that makes the immature intestine sensitive to the pro-inflammatory effects of enteral feeding. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/BONen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeonatologyen_HK
dc.rightsNeonatology: foetal and neonatal research. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subjectGerm freeen_HK
dc.subjectMicrobial colonizationen_HK
dc.subjectNecrotizing enterocolitisen_HK
dc.subjectProteomicsen_HK
dc.subjectTwo-dimensional gel electrophoresisen_HK
dc.titleBacterial colonization affects the intestinal proteome of preterm pigs susceptible to necrotizing enterocolitisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1661-7800&volume=99&issue=4&spage=280&epage=288&date=2010&atitle=Bacterial+colonization+affects+the+intestinal+proteome+of+preterm+pigs+susceptible+to+necrotizing+enterocolitis-
dc.identifier.emailWan, JMF: jmfwan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWan, JMF=rp00798en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000317807en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21135563-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649700775en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184821en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649700775&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume99en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage280en_HK
dc.identifier.epage288en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292043200007-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, P=36147603700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSangild, PT=7004115316en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiggers, RH=14421699900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSit, WH=8528923000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CL=36600490300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, JMF=8930305000en_HK

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