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Article: Lower lung cancer mortality in obesity
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TitleLower lung cancer mortality in obesity
 
AuthorsLeung, CC4
Lam, TH1
Yew, WW3
Chan, WM2
Law, WS4
Tam, CM4
 
KeywordsBody mass index
Lung cancer
Mortality
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2011, v. 40 n. 1, p. 174-182 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyq134
 
AbstractBackground: Malignancy is the leading cause of death in Hong Kong, and lung cancer tops the list of all cancer deaths. Methods: A cohort of clients aged ≥65 years, enrolled at 18 elderly health centres in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003, was followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death until 31 December 2008, using the identity card number as unique identifier. All subjects with suspected cancer, significant weight loss of>5% within past 6 months or obstructive lung disease at the baseline were excluded. Results: After a total of 423 061 person-years of follow-up, 932, 690 and 1433 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was independently (and negatively) associated with death from lung cancer after adjustment for other baseline variables, whereas there was only a minor or no effect for other smoking-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. Obesity with BMI≥30 [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.80] was associated with reduced lung cancer mortality, which was more prominent than the opposing effect of underweight (adjusted HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.79). Consistent effects of BMI were observed after stratification into never-smokers and ever-smokers and in sensitivity analysis after excluding deaths within the first 3 years. Conclusion: Obesity was associated with lower lung cancer mortality in this prospective cohort analysis. As the effect was rather specific for lung cancer, further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanism. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0300-5771
2012 Impact Factor: 6.982
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.737
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyq134
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000288720900021
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorYew, WW
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, CM
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-11T08:32:22Z
 
dc.date.available2011-05-11T08:32:22Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Malignancy is the leading cause of death in Hong Kong, and lung cancer tops the list of all cancer deaths. Methods: A cohort of clients aged ≥65 years, enrolled at 18 elderly health centres in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003, was followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death until 31 December 2008, using the identity card number as unique identifier. All subjects with suspected cancer, significant weight loss of>5% within past 6 months or obstructive lung disease at the baseline were excluded. Results: After a total of 423 061 person-years of follow-up, 932, 690 and 1433 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was independently (and negatively) associated with death from lung cancer after adjustment for other baseline variables, whereas there was only a minor or no effect for other smoking-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. Obesity with BMI≥30 [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.80] was associated with reduced lung cancer mortality, which was more prominent than the opposing effect of underweight (adjusted HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.79). Consistent effects of BMI were observed after stratification into never-smokers and ever-smokers and in sensitivity analysis after excluding deaths within the first 3 years. Conclusion: Obesity was associated with lower lung cancer mortality in this prospective cohort analysis. As the effect was rather specific for lung cancer, further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanism. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2011, v. 40 n. 1, p. 174-182 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyq134
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyq134
 
dc.identifier.epage182
 
dc.identifier.hkuros184993
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288720900021
 
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771
2012 Impact Factor: 6.982
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.737
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20709687
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952049461
 
dc.identifier.spage174
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133341
 
dc.identifier.volume40
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectBody mass index
 
dc.subjectLung cancer
 
dc.subjectMortality
 
dc.titleLower lung cancer mortality in obesity
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Law, WS</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background: Malignancy is the leading cause of death in Hong Kong, and lung cancer tops the list of all cancer deaths. Methods: A cohort of clients aged &#8805;65 years, enrolled at 18 elderly health centres in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003, was followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death until 31 December 2008, using the identity card number as unique identifier. All subjects with suspected cancer, significant weight loss of&gt;5% within past 6 months or obstructive lung disease at the baseline were excluded. Results: After a total of 423 061 person-years of follow-up, 932, 690 and 1433 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was independently (and negatively) associated with death from lung cancer after adjustment for other baseline variables, whereas there was only a minor or no effect for other smoking-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. Obesity with BMI&#8805;30 [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.80] was associated with reduced lung cancer mortality, which was more prominent than the opposing effect of underweight (adjusted HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.79). Consistent effects of BMI were observed after stratification into never-smokers and ever-smokers and in sensitivity analysis after excluding deaths within the first 3 years. Conclusion: Obesity was associated with lower lung cancer mortality in this prospective cohort analysis. As the effect was rather specific for lung cancer, further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanism. &#169; The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Government
  3. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong
  4. Tuberculosis and Chest Service