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Article: Gambling and completed suicide in Hong Kong: A review of coroner court files

TitleGambling and completed suicide in Hong Kong: A review of coroner court files
Authors
KeywordsAdult
Cause of death
Court
Female
Financial management
Issue Date2010
PublisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com/pcc/index.htm
Citation
Primary Care Companion To The Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2010, v. 12 n. 6, p. e1-e7 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Previous studies have established a positive relationship between gambling and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Limited studies have investigated the role of gambling in completed suicide. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of gambling behavior among suicides and to compare the correlates of nongambling and gambling with and without related debt suicides. Method: The death records from the coroner's court files of suicides (N = 1,201) in Hong Kong in 2003 were reviewed. Logistic regression models were used to investigate relevant correlates in suicides with gambling behavior and debt due to gambling compared to suicides with gambling behavior but no debt and nongamblers. Results: Of the suicide victims, 233 (19.4%) showed evidence of gambling behavior prior to death; 110 of the 233 gambling suicides (47.2%) involved individuals who were indebted due to gambling. In comparison with the other 2 groups, the gambling with debt suicide victims were more likely to be male, aged 30-49 years old, married, and employed and to have died by charcoal burning (carbon monoxide poisoning). These individuals also had fewer recorded medical and psychiatric problems in the past year and lifetime. When comparing suicides with gambling behavior with and without gambling-related debt, the indebted victims were more likely to also have had debt problems not attributed to gambling (OR = 149.66, P <.001) and to have been disturbed by loan sharks prior to death (OR = 28.14, P <.001) but were less likely to have recorded psychiatric disorders during their lifetime (OR = 0.41, P <.05) and at the time of death (OR = 0.26, P <.05). Conclusions: Gambling and indebted suicides have a distinct profile and may be difficult to predict using standard risk factors as references. This finding suggests the need for improved detection and suicide prevention efforts related to gambling in individuals with gambling-related debt. © 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133328
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.300
PubMed Central ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, PWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorConner, KRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorConwell, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-11T08:31:50Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-11T08:31:50Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPrimary Care Companion To The Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2010, v. 12 n. 6, p. e1-e7en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1523-5998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133328-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous studies have established a positive relationship between gambling and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Limited studies have investigated the role of gambling in completed suicide. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of gambling behavior among suicides and to compare the correlates of nongambling and gambling with and without related debt suicides. Method: The death records from the coroner's court files of suicides (N = 1,201) in Hong Kong in 2003 were reviewed. Logistic regression models were used to investigate relevant correlates in suicides with gambling behavior and debt due to gambling compared to suicides with gambling behavior but no debt and nongamblers. Results: Of the suicide victims, 233 (19.4%) showed evidence of gambling behavior prior to death; 110 of the 233 gambling suicides (47.2%) involved individuals who were indebted due to gambling. In comparison with the other 2 groups, the gambling with debt suicide victims were more likely to be male, aged 30-49 years old, married, and employed and to have died by charcoal burning (carbon monoxide poisoning). These individuals also had fewer recorded medical and psychiatric problems in the past year and lifetime. When comparing suicides with gambling behavior with and without gambling-related debt, the indebted victims were more likely to also have had debt problems not attributed to gambling (OR = 149.66, P <.001) and to have been disturbed by loan sharks prior to death (OR = 28.14, P <.001) but were less likely to have recorded psychiatric disorders during their lifetime (OR = 0.41, P <.05) and at the time of death (OR = 0.26, P <.05). Conclusions: Gambling and indebted suicides have a distinct profile and may be difficult to predict using standard risk factors as references. This finding suggests the need for improved detection and suicide prevention efforts related to gambling in individuals with gambling-related debt. © 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com/pcc/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subjectAdult-
dc.subjectCause of death-
dc.subjectCourt-
dc.subjectFemale-
dc.subjectFinancial management-
dc.titleGambling and completed suicide in Hong Kong: A review of coroner court filesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1523-5998&volume=12&issue=6&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Gambling+and+completed+suicide+in+Hong+Kong:+A+review+of+coroner+court+files-
dc.identifier.emailWong, PWC: paulw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, PWC=rp00591en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.4088/PCC.09m00932bluen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21494351-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3067982-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79251513931en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184781en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros225133-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79251513931&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1555-2101-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, PWC=13607861800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, DYT=35760819300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConner, KR=7005832037en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConwell, Y=7006293352en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK

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