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Article: Physical collisions and injury during professional rugby league skills training

TitlePhysical collisions and injury during professional rugby league skills training
Authors
KeywordsConditioning
Contact sport
Injury incidence
Microtechnology
Rugby league
Skill
Team sport
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2
Citation
Journal Of Science And Medicine In Sport, 2010, v. 13 n. 6, p. 578-583 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study described the number and intensity of collisions experienced by professional rugby league players during pre-season and in-season skills training sessions using microtechnology (e.g. accelerometers, gyroscopes). Short, medium, and long recovery periods between matches were accounted for and the incidence of collision injuries sustained in the training environment was also assessed. Thirty professional rugby league players (mean ± SD age, 23.6 ± 3.8. yr) participated in this study. The number and intensity of collisions and the incidence of collision injuries were monitored during 117 skills training sessions. Over the course of the season, an average of 77 collisions occurred per player, per session. The average number of mild, moderate, and heavy collisions performed by each member of the squad per session was 24, 46, and 7, respectively. A total of 37 collision injuries were recorded during training over the season, equating to an injury incidence of 6.4 per 10,000 collisions. Over half (54.1%) of all collision injuries resulted in no loss of training time, and less than 14% of collision injuries resulted in a missed match. The greatest number of collisions occurred during training sessions in the weeks with the longest recovery between matches (10 days). The incidence of collision injuries also peaked during the 10 day between match recovery cycle. These findings demonstrate that while significant physiological demands are placed on rugby league players as a result of the large number and intensity of physical collisions performed in training, these collisions are associated with minimal injury risk. © 2010 Sports Medicine Australia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133253
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.756
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.484
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGabbett, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-04T07:52:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-04T07:52:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Science And Medicine In Sport, 2010, v. 13 n. 6, p. 578-583en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133253-
dc.description.abstractThis study described the number and intensity of collisions experienced by professional rugby league players during pre-season and in-season skills training sessions using microtechnology (e.g. accelerometers, gyroscopes). Short, medium, and long recovery periods between matches were accounted for and the incidence of collision injuries sustained in the training environment was also assessed. Thirty professional rugby league players (mean ± SD age, 23.6 ± 3.8. yr) participated in this study. The number and intensity of collisions and the incidence of collision injuries were monitored during 117 skills training sessions. Over the course of the season, an average of 77 collisions occurred per player, per session. The average number of mild, moderate, and heavy collisions performed by each member of the squad per session was 24, 46, and 7, respectively. A total of 37 collision injuries were recorded during training over the season, equating to an injury incidence of 6.4 per 10,000 collisions. Over half (54.1%) of all collision injuries resulted in no loss of training time, and less than 14% of collision injuries resulted in a missed match. The greatest number of collisions occurred during training sessions in the weeks with the longest recovery between matches (10 days). The incidence of collision injuries also peaked during the 10 day between match recovery cycle. These findings demonstrate that while significant physiological demands are placed on rugby league players as a result of the large number and intensity of physical collisions performed in training, these collisions are associated with minimal injury risk. © 2010 Sports Medicine Australia.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Science and Medicine in Sporten_HK
dc.subjectConditioningen_HK
dc.subjectContact sporten_HK
dc.subjectInjury incidenceen_HK
dc.subjectMicrotechnologyen_HK
dc.subjectRugby leagueen_HK
dc.subjectSkillen_HK
dc.subjectTeam sporten_HK
dc.titlePhysical collisions and injury during professional rugby league skills trainingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1440-2440&volume=13&issue=6&spage=578&epage=583&date=2010&atitle=Physical+collisions+and+injury+during+professional+rugby+league+skills+training-
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, B: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, B=rp00886en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2010.03.007en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20483661-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958501121en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182601-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77958501121&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage578en_HK
dc.identifier.epage583en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284302900005-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGabbett, T=6603756203en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJenkins, D=7401557589en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbernethy, B=8841578500en_HK

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