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Article: Establishing a liberal political order through a constitution: The Papua New Guinea experience

TitleEstablishing a liberal political order through a constitution: The Papua New Guinea experience
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DECH
Citation
Development And Change, 1997, v. 28 n. 2, p. 303-330 How to Cite?
AbstractThe experience with the independent constitution of Papua New Guinea is examined in this article to argue that, while constitutions are able to set up institutions and define their jurisdiction, they are less effective in establishing values and norms. Constitutions establish broad frameworks for politics but are rarely successful in determining the dynamics of politics or the conduct of parties, which depend principally on social and economic circumstances. The parliamentary system in PNG has been influenced more by traditional notions of clan leadership and reciprocity than by any Westminster convention. In PNG, the courts and other institutions for discipline and control of administration have been more effective than in many other developing countries, principally due to the weakness of the state-political system. Nevertheless, there remains considerable tension between the Rule of Law and democracy as it has developed in PNG.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133021
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.72
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.069
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGhai, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-18T03:06:43Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-18T03:06:43Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDevelopment And Change, 1997, v. 28 n. 2, p. 303-330en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0012-155Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133021-
dc.description.abstractThe experience with the independent constitution of Papua New Guinea is examined in this article to argue that, while constitutions are able to set up institutions and define their jurisdiction, they are less effective in establishing values and norms. Constitutions establish broad frameworks for politics but are rarely successful in determining the dynamics of politics or the conduct of parties, which depend principally on social and economic circumstances. The parliamentary system in PNG has been influenced more by traditional notions of clan leadership and reciprocity than by any Westminster convention. In PNG, the courts and other institutions for discipline and control of administration have been more effective than in many other developing countries, principally due to the weakness of the state-political system. Nevertheless, there remains considerable tension between the Rule of Law and democracy as it has developed in PNG.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DECHen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopment and Changeen_HK
dc.titleEstablishing a liberal political order through a constitution: The Papua New Guinea experienceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGhai, Y:ypghai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGhai, Y=rp01483en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031435422en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031435422&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage303en_HK
dc.identifier.epage330en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhai, Y=6602392504en_HK

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