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Article: A tale of three constitutions: Ethnicity and politics in Fiji

TitleA tale of three constitutions: Ethnicity and politics in Fiji
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://icon.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Constitutional Law, 2007, v. 5 n. 4, p. 639-669 How to Cite?
AbstractThere have been sharp divisions of opinion throughout Fiji's modern history between those advocating an integrated, nonracial state, based on individual rights, and those in favor of a political order based on ethnic communities. Integration and consociation, perhaps, are not apt terms to categorize this division, but, certainly, they have some resonance. Many features associated with consociation have been present in the colonial and the postcolonial constitutions, such as separate communal representation, group rights, asymmetrical autonomy, power sharing, separate educational systems, and entrenchment of rights to culture and land. Norms regarding indigenous peoples' rights have been invoked, as well, adding an extra twist to the integration-consociation polarity. But there have also been strong tendencies toward political integration and broad-based, nonethnic social justice policies. Fiji's experience shows that this polarity has limited intellectual or policy value. Consociation easily and, in Fiji's case, seamlessly slides into hegemony. © The Author 2007. Oxford University Press and New York University School of Law. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133015
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.667
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.613
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGhai, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCottrell, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-18T01:57:00Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-18T01:57:00Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Constitutional Law, 2007, v. 5 n. 4, p. 639-669en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1474-2640en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133015-
dc.description.abstractThere have been sharp divisions of opinion throughout Fiji's modern history between those advocating an integrated, nonracial state, based on individual rights, and those in favor of a political order based on ethnic communities. Integration and consociation, perhaps, are not apt terms to categorize this division, but, certainly, they have some resonance. Many features associated with consociation have been present in the colonial and the postcolonial constitutions, such as separate communal representation, group rights, asymmetrical autonomy, power sharing, separate educational systems, and entrenchment of rights to culture and land. Norms regarding indigenous peoples' rights have been invoked, as well, adding an extra twist to the integration-consociation polarity. But there have also been strong tendencies toward political integration and broad-based, nonethnic social justice policies. Fiji's experience shows that this polarity has limited intellectual or policy value. Consociation easily and, in Fiji's case, seamlessly slides into hegemony. © The Author 2007. Oxford University Press and New York University School of Law. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://icon.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Constitutional Lawen_HK
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.titleA tale of three constitutions: Ethnicity and politics in Fijien_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1474-2640&volume=5&issue=4&spage=639&epage=669 &date=Oct&atitle=A+tale+of+three+constitutions:+Ethnicity+and+politics+in+Fiji-
dc.identifier.emailGhai, Y:ypghai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGhai, Y=rp01483en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/icon/mom030en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35648994812en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35648994812&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage639en_HK
dc.identifier.epage669en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250680100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhai, Y=6602392504en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCottrell, J=16686551600en_HK

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