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Article: Long-term retention rates of lamotrigine, gabapentin, and topiramate in chronic epilepsy

TitleLong-term retention rates of lamotrigine, gabapentin, and topiramate in chronic epilepsy
Authors
KeywordsChronic epilepsy
New antiepileptic drugs
Retention rates
Issue Date2000
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epilepsia.com/
Citation
Epilepsia, 2000, v. 41 n. 12, p. 1592-1596 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: We sought to determine the long-term retention rates of lamotrigine (LTG), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM) therapy for patients at a tertiary referral clinic for chronic, refractory epilepsy. Methods: We analyzed 424 consecutive patients with chronic, refractory partial and/or generalized epilepsy who were started on LTG, 158 patients who were started on GBP, and 393 patients who were started on TPM. The percentages of patients who continued therapy with LTG, GBP, and TPM were estimated with the use of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Factors that influence retention were analyzed with the use of Cox regression analysis. Results: Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that at 3 years, 30% continued therapy on TPM compared with 29% on LTG and fewer than 10% on GBP. Adverse events resulted in therapy withdrawal in 40% of patients on TPM compared with GBP (37%) and LTG (22%). Perceived lack of efficacy led to treatment withdrawal in 39% of patients on GBP compared with 34% on LTG and 19% on TPM. Cox regression estimated that a fourth or fewer of patients with chronic partial epilepsy are likely to continue therapy with a new antiepileptic drug beyond 5 years. Conclusions: The impact of these new antiepileptic drugs on the long-term course of chronic partial epilepsy is likely to be small, as approximately three of four patients will discontinue therapy. More patients appear to continue on TPM compared with LTG or GBP, with a possible reason being better perceived efficacy of TPM, despite having the highest incidence of adverse events.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132913
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.706
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.579
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLhatoo, SDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPolizzi, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSander, JWASen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:57Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpilepsia, 2000, v. 41 n. 12, p. 1592-1596en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0013-9580en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132913-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We sought to determine the long-term retention rates of lamotrigine (LTG), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM) therapy for patients at a tertiary referral clinic for chronic, refractory epilepsy. Methods: We analyzed 424 consecutive patients with chronic, refractory partial and/or generalized epilepsy who were started on LTG, 158 patients who were started on GBP, and 393 patients who were started on TPM. The percentages of patients who continued therapy with LTG, GBP, and TPM were estimated with the use of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Factors that influence retention were analyzed with the use of Cox regression analysis. Results: Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that at 3 years, 30% continued therapy on TPM compared with 29% on LTG and fewer than 10% on GBP. Adverse events resulted in therapy withdrawal in 40% of patients on TPM compared with GBP (37%) and LTG (22%). Perceived lack of efficacy led to treatment withdrawal in 39% of patients on GBP compared with 34% on LTG and 19% on TPM. Cox regression estimated that a fourth or fewer of patients with chronic partial epilepsy are likely to continue therapy with a new antiepileptic drug beyond 5 years. Conclusions: The impact of these new antiepileptic drugs on the long-term course of chronic partial epilepsy is likely to be small, as approximately three of four patients will discontinue therapy. More patients appear to continue on TPM compared with LTG or GBP, with a possible reason being better perceived efficacy of TPM, despite having the highest incidence of adverse events.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epilepsia.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpilepsiaen_HK
dc.subjectChronic epilepsyen_HK
dc.subjectNew antiepileptic drugsen_HK
dc.subjectRetention ratesen_HK
dc.titleLong-term retention rates of lamotrigine, gabapentin, and topiramate in chronic epilepsyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11114218-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034535755en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034535755&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume41en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1592en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1596en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000165835600013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLhatoo, SD=35482407900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPolizzi, G=36931570100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSander, JWAS=7202898360en_HK

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