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Article: Evaluation of the effectiveness of UK community pharmacists' interventions in community palliative care

TitleEvaluation of the effectiveness of UK community pharmacists' interventions in community palliative care
Authors
KeywordsCommunity care
Medicines management
Palliative care
Pharmacist intervention
Issue Date2002
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://pmj.sagepub.com
Citation
Palliative Medicine, 2002, v. 16 n. 3, p. 219-225 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: In 1997, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain Working Party reported that UK community pharmacists had a crucial role in effective medicines management and effective symptom control for those receiving palliative care in the community. However, prior to the integration of community pharmacists into the community palliative team, it is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of their pharmaceutical interventions. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of community pharmacists' clinical interventions in supporting palliative care patients in primary care using an independent multidisciplinary panel review. Methods: Patients with a life expectancy of less than 12 months were each registered with a single pharmacy and their consent was obtained for the community pharmacists to access their general practitioner (GP) case records. The community pharmacists received training in palliative pharmaceutical care and documenting interventions. The trained community pharmacists provided palliative pharmaceutical care to the recruited patients. At the end of a 10-month period, the clinical interventions were reviewed by an independent multidisciplinary expert panel consisting of a palliative care consultant, a Macmillan nurse (community palliative care nurse) and a hospital pharmacist with special interest in palliative care. Results: Fourteen community palliative care teams (including community pharmacists, GPs and community nurses) took part in the study and 25 patients were recruited over the 10-month recording period. All but one patient had a diagnosis of cancer; the other patient had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By the end of the project, 14 patients had died. Community pharmacists recorded a total of 130 clinical interventions. Thirty interventions were excluded as insufficient information had been documented to allow review by the panel. Eighty-one per cent of the interventions were judged by the expert panel likely to be beneficial. However, 3% were judged likely to be detrimental to the patients' well-being. Conclusions: Most of the clinical interventions made by the community pharmacists for palliative pharmaceutical care were judged by the expert panel as being likely to be beneficial. The result supports the view that when community pharmacists are appropriately trained and included as integrated members of the team, they can intervene effectively to improve pharmaceutical care for palliative care patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132908
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.685
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.914
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNeedham, DSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCampion, PDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:55Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:55Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPalliative Medicine, 2002, v. 16 n. 3, p. 219-225en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-2163en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132908-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: In 1997, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain Working Party reported that UK community pharmacists had a crucial role in effective medicines management and effective symptom control for those receiving palliative care in the community. However, prior to the integration of community pharmacists into the community palliative team, it is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of their pharmaceutical interventions. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of community pharmacists' clinical interventions in supporting palliative care patients in primary care using an independent multidisciplinary panel review. Methods: Patients with a life expectancy of less than 12 months were each registered with a single pharmacy and their consent was obtained for the community pharmacists to access their general practitioner (GP) case records. The community pharmacists received training in palliative pharmaceutical care and documenting interventions. The trained community pharmacists provided palliative pharmaceutical care to the recruited patients. At the end of a 10-month period, the clinical interventions were reviewed by an independent multidisciplinary expert panel consisting of a palliative care consultant, a Macmillan nurse (community palliative care nurse) and a hospital pharmacist with special interest in palliative care. Results: Fourteen community palliative care teams (including community pharmacists, GPs and community nurses) took part in the study and 25 patients were recruited over the 10-month recording period. All but one patient had a diagnosis of cancer; the other patient had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By the end of the project, 14 patients had died. Community pharmacists recorded a total of 130 clinical interventions. Thirty interventions were excluded as insufficient information had been documented to allow review by the panel. Eighty-one per cent of the interventions were judged by the expert panel likely to be beneficial. However, 3% were judged likely to be detrimental to the patients' well-being. Conclusions: Most of the clinical interventions made by the community pharmacists for palliative pharmaceutical care were judged by the expert panel as being likely to be beneficial. The result supports the view that when community pharmacists are appropriately trained and included as integrated members of the team, they can intervene effectively to improve pharmaceutical care for palliative care patients.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://pmj.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPalliative Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectCommunity careen_HK
dc.subjectMedicines managementen_HK
dc.subjectPalliative careen_HK
dc.subjectPharmacist interventionen_HK
dc.titleEvaluation of the effectiveness of UK community pharmacists' interventions in community palliative careen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/0269216302pm533oaen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12046998-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036108005en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036108005&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage219en_HK
dc.identifier.epage225en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000175732000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNeedham, DS=7102365721en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCampion, PD=7006820227en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3319817-

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