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Article: Cost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion as adjuvant therapy to endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

TitleCost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion as adjuvant therapy to endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2003
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gie
Citation
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 2003, v. 57 n. 2, p. 160-164 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Intravenous administration of proton pump inhibitors after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrent bleeding and the need for subsequent surgery. Yet there is a relative lack of formal assessment of this practice. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of this therapy by using standard pharmacoeconomic methods. Methods: The present study was performed in conjunction with a randomized controlled clinical trial that included 232 patients who received either omeprazole (80 mg intravenous bolus followed by infusion at 8 mg/hour for 72 hours) or placebo after hemostasis was achieved endoscopically. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the different outcomes of the trial. All related direct medical costs were identified from patient records. Cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Results: Analysis by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that the direct medical cost in the omeprazole group was lower than that for the placebo group. Cost-effectiveness ratios for omeprazole and placebo groups were, respectively, HK$ 28,764 (US$ 3688) and HK$ 36,992 (US$ 4743) in averting one episode of recurrent bleeding in one patient after initial hemostasis was achieved endoscopically. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of high-dose omeprazole appears to be a cost-effective therapy in reducing the recurrence of bleeding and need for surgery in patients with active bleeding ulcer after initial hemostasis is obtained endoscopically.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132907
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.217
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.390
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, KKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYou, JHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, SKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, JYWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, JTFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WYSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSung, JJYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, SSCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:55Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:55Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGastrointestinal Endoscopy, 2003, v. 57 n. 2, p. 160-164en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0016-5107en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132907-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Intravenous administration of proton pump inhibitors after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrent bleeding and the need for subsequent surgery. Yet there is a relative lack of formal assessment of this practice. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of this therapy by using standard pharmacoeconomic methods. Methods: The present study was performed in conjunction with a randomized controlled clinical trial that included 232 patients who received either omeprazole (80 mg intravenous bolus followed by infusion at 8 mg/hour for 72 hours) or placebo after hemostasis was achieved endoscopically. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the different outcomes of the trial. All related direct medical costs were identified from patient records. Cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Results: Analysis by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that the direct medical cost in the omeprazole group was lower than that for the placebo group. Cost-effectiveness ratios for omeprazole and placebo groups were, respectively, HK$ 28,764 (US$ 3688) and HK$ 36,992 (US$ 4743) in averting one episode of recurrent bleeding in one patient after initial hemostasis was achieved endoscopically. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of high-dose omeprazole appears to be a cost-effective therapy in reducing the recurrence of bleeding and need for surgery in patients with active bleeding ulcer after initial hemostasis is obtained endoscopically.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gieen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGastrointestinal Endoscopyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_US
dc.titleCost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion as adjuvant therapy to endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1067/mge.2003.74en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12556776-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037324108en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037324108&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage160en_HK
dc.identifier.epage164en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180730000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, KKC=7501515004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYou, JHS=35231883000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, SKS=8069268700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, JYW=13907867100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TYK=7402687410en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, JTF=26643560600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WYS=8069269100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSung, JJY=35405352400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SSC=7404292955en_HK

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