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Article: A feasibility study for recording of dispensing errors and 'near misses' in four UK primary care pharmacies

TitleA feasibility study for recording of dispensing errors and 'near misses' in four UK primary care pharmacies
Authors
KeywordsReferences (48) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2003
PublisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://drugsafety.adisonline.com/
Citation
Drug Safety, 2003, v. 26 n. 11, p. 803-813 How to Cite?
AbstractMedication errors can occur at the prescribing, transcription, dispensing and administration stage of drug therapy. However, publication of the Organisation with a Memory (OWAM) by the Department of Health in the UK has raised awareness of the need for pharmacies to collect information about dispensing errors and near misses, which occur within an organisation. Such information provides valuable insights into the vulnerabilities of dispensing procedures and identifies areas for improvement in dispensing systems. The main aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a self-reporting system for dispensing errors and near misses in primary care (community) pharmacies. It was also to identify the types of errors or near misses commonly encountered in community pharmacies. A data collection form was designed and modified for use after a pilot study. Four community pharmacies volunteered to participate in this feasibility study. The data collection was conducted in two phases each of 4 weeks' duration. Any dispensing errors and near misses that occurred during the study periods were recorded by the pharmacy staff in a standard data collection form. A focus group discussion was held with the dispensing staff of participating pharmacies to identify and evaluate the feasibility of the reporting system. Out of a total of 51 357 items dispensed during the two phases of the study, 39 dispensing errors (0.08%) and 247 near misses (0.48%) were detected. The results show that near misses occurred six times more often than dispensing errors, indicating the importance of final checking in pharmacies. The most common types of dispensing errors or near misses appeared to be incorrect strength of medication, followed by incorrect drug, incorrect quantity, incorrect dosage form and incorrect label. Feedback during the focus group discussion indicated that the outcome of the self-reporting scheme was more important than the incidence of errors or near misses. Participating pharmacies also agreed that the self-reporting scheme used was feasible and they would continue using the scheme although some incentives would be helpful. The quantitative results of this study and the qualitative feedback from the participating pharmacies indicate that the self-reporting scheme used is practical and feasible.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132904
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.206
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.359
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChua, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEdmondson, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeacham, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHill, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGrantham, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:54Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:54Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDrug Safety, 2003, v. 26 n. 11, p. 803-813en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0114-5916en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132904-
dc.description.abstractMedication errors can occur at the prescribing, transcription, dispensing and administration stage of drug therapy. However, publication of the Organisation with a Memory (OWAM) by the Department of Health in the UK has raised awareness of the need for pharmacies to collect information about dispensing errors and near misses, which occur within an organisation. Such information provides valuable insights into the vulnerabilities of dispensing procedures and identifies areas for improvement in dispensing systems. The main aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a self-reporting system for dispensing errors and near misses in primary care (community) pharmacies. It was also to identify the types of errors or near misses commonly encountered in community pharmacies. A data collection form was designed and modified for use after a pilot study. Four community pharmacies volunteered to participate in this feasibility study. The data collection was conducted in two phases each of 4 weeks' duration. Any dispensing errors and near misses that occurred during the study periods were recorded by the pharmacy staff in a standard data collection form. A focus group discussion was held with the dispensing staff of participating pharmacies to identify and evaluate the feasibility of the reporting system. Out of a total of 51 357 items dispensed during the two phases of the study, 39 dispensing errors (0.08%) and 247 near misses (0.48%) were detected. The results show that near misses occurred six times more often than dispensing errors, indicating the importance of final checking in pharmacies. The most common types of dispensing errors or near misses appeared to be incorrect strength of medication, followed by incorrect drug, incorrect quantity, incorrect dosage form and incorrect label. Feedback during the focus group discussion indicated that the outcome of the self-reporting scheme was more important than the incidence of errors or near misses. Participating pharmacies also agreed that the self-reporting scheme used was feasible and they would continue using the scheme although some incentives would be helpful. The quantitative results of this study and the qualitative feedback from the participating pharmacies indicate that the self-reporting scheme used is practical and feasible.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://drugsafety.adisonline.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDrug Safetyen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (48) View In Table Layouten_US
dc.titleA feasibility study for recording of dispensing errors and 'near misses' in four UK primary care pharmaciesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2165/00002018-200326110-00005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12908849-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042856267en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042856267&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage803en_HK
dc.identifier.epage813en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185067100005-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, SS=9841352700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdmondson, H=17340277200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAllen, C=55057696100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, J=7401728960en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeacham, J=6505679221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHill, G=7401964095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGrantham, J=7101669595en_HK

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