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Article: Systematic review of medication errors in pediatric patients

TitleSystematic review of medication errors in pediatric patients
Authors
KeywordsMedication errors
Pdiatrics
Issue Date2006
PublisherHarvey Whitney Books Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theannals.com
Citation
Annals Of Pharmacotherapy, 2006, v. 40 n. 10, p. 1766-1776 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To systematically locate and review studies that have investigated the incidence of medication errors (MEs) in pediatric inpatients and identify common errors. METHODS: A systematic search of studies related to MEs in children was performed using the following databases: MEDLINE (1951-April 2006), EMBASE (1966-April 2006), Pharm-line (1978-April 2006), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2006), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1982-April 2006), and British Nursing Index (1994-April 2006). Studies of the incidence and nature of MEs in pediatrics were included. The title, abstract, or full article was reviewed for relevance; any study not related to MEs in children was excluded. RESULTS: Three methods were used to detect MEs in the studies reviewed: spontaneous reporting (n = 10), medication order or chart review (n = 14), or observation (n = 8). There was great variation in the definitions of ME used and the error rates reported. The most common type of ME was dosing error, often involving 10 times the actual dose required. Antibiotics and sedatives were the most common classes of drugs associated with MEs; these are probably among the most common drugs prescribed. CONCLUSIONS: Interpretation of the literature was hindered by variation in definitions employed by different researchers, varying research methods and setting, and a lack of theory-based research. Overall, it would appear that our initial concern about MEs in pediatrics has been validated; however, we do not know the actual size of the problem. Further work to determine the incidence and causes of MEs in pediatrics is urgently needed, as well as evaluation of the best interventions to reduce them.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132871
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.119
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.863
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGhaleb, MAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, BDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, VWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhaki, ZFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:43Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:43Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Pharmacotherapy, 2006, v. 40 n. 10, p. 1766-1776en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1060-0280en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132871-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To systematically locate and review studies that have investigated the incidence of medication errors (MEs) in pediatric inpatients and identify common errors. METHODS: A systematic search of studies related to MEs in children was performed using the following databases: MEDLINE (1951-April 2006), EMBASE (1966-April 2006), Pharm-line (1978-April 2006), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2006), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1982-April 2006), and British Nursing Index (1994-April 2006). Studies of the incidence and nature of MEs in pediatrics were included. The title, abstract, or full article was reviewed for relevance; any study not related to MEs in children was excluded. RESULTS: Three methods were used to detect MEs in the studies reviewed: spontaneous reporting (n = 10), medication order or chart review (n = 14), or observation (n = 8). There was great variation in the definitions of ME used and the error rates reported. The most common type of ME was dosing error, often involving 10 times the actual dose required. Antibiotics and sedatives were the most common classes of drugs associated with MEs; these are probably among the most common drugs prescribed. CONCLUSIONS: Interpretation of the literature was hindered by variation in definitions employed by different researchers, varying research methods and setting, and a lack of theory-based research. Overall, it would appear that our initial concern about MEs in pediatrics has been validated; however, we do not know the actual size of the problem. Further work to determine the incidence and causes of MEs in pediatrics is urgently needed, as well as evaluation of the best interventions to reduce them.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHarvey Whitney Books Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theannals.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Pharmacotherapyen_HK
dc.subjectMedication errorsen_HK
dc.subjectPdiatricsen_HK
dc.titleSystematic review of medication errors in pediatric patientsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1345/aph.1G717en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16985096-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749610185en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33749610185&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1766en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1776en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241131800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhaleb, MA=8903103000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarber, N=7005001200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFranklin, BD=16416542300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, VWS=9841023300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhaki, ZF=12766057000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK

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